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Phyllis Schlafly The Washington Times

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Phyllis Schlafly, always in the forefront in the fight against ERA, holds up a manual as she tells a news conference in Houston, Texas on Sunday, Nov. 20, 1977 that the tax payers of the nation are entitled to “know how much money was spent and how it was spent” for the National Women’s Conference. Schlafly said the conference was controlled by ERA supporters with no chance for the opposition to express their views on resolutions. (AP Photo)

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Phyllis Schlafly speaks during an interview in her office Wednesday, March 7, 2007, in Clayton, Mo. At 82 the matriarch of the conservative movement is showing no signs of slowing down and is still speaking out against abortion and illegal immigrants, still fighting the Equal Rights Amendment and still a thorn in the side of not only Democrats but of Republicans she sees as leaning too far to the left. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

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Phyllis Schlafly sits at her desk during an interview in her office Wednesday, March 7, 2007 in Clayton, Mo. At 82 the matriarch of the conservative movement is showing no signs of slowing down and is still speaking out against abortion and illegal immigrants, still fighting the Equal Rights Amendment and still a thorn in the side of not only Democrats but of Republicans she sees as leaning too far to the left. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

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In this March 11, 2016 photo, longtime conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly, 91, endorses Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump before Trump begins speaking at a campaign rally in St. Louis. Her support for Trump has led to internal strife _ and what she claims was an attempt to oust her _ at the organization she formed nearly a half-century ago to fight the Equal Rights Amendment. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)

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Phyllis Schlafly listens to the music as the graduates are seated before she is awarded an honorary degree at the Washington University commencement, Friday, May 16, 2008 in St. Louis. Schlafly, a conservative activist, holds a bachelor's and law degrees from the university.(AP Photo/Tom Gannam)

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Conservative icon Phyllis Schlafly (Photo by Judson Phillips)

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Phyllis Schlafly of Alton, Ill., in Chicago on Wednesday, Dec. 7, 1977, says that she won?t seek the U.S. Senate seat held by Charles H. Percy, also a Republican, in the March 21 primary. Mrs. Schlafly, allied with several conservative causes, conducted the press conference outdoors in Chicago?s subfreezing weather. (AP Photo)

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Phyllis Schlafly: Still seeking the conservative choice, not an echo - Advertising Supplement cover (February 25, 2015)

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Phyllis Schlafly Portrait Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

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Conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly says reviving a strong, self-sufficient family culture is the only way out of the nation's financial mess. (Associated Press)

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Phyllis Schlafly

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Sen. Jesse Helms, North Carolina Republican (left), who took delight in being called "Senator No" for opposing liberal legislation, was joined by conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly and Sen. Orrin G. Hatch, Utah Republican, at an anti-Equal Rights Amendment dinner in March 1979 in Washington. (Associated Press/File)