Politburo

Latest Politburo Items
  • **FILE** A huge screen shows a broadcast of China's new Communist Party General Secretary Xi Jinping speaking in Beijing's Great Hall of the People on Nov. 15, 2012. (Associated Press)

    China's Xi warns party of corruption scourge

    China's new leader Xi Jinping is highlighting corruption as a scourge that could bring down the Communist Party, though he has yet to offer any specific new proposals to stop it.


  • New Chinese leader Xi talks tough on corruption

    China's new leader is highlighting corruption as a scourge that could bring down the Communist Party, though he has yet to offer any specific new proposals to stop it.


  • With a once-a-decade leadership transition in China set to kick off Nov. 8, many are waiting to see whether Liu Yandong can become the first woman to serve on the powerful nine-member Politburo Standing Committee. (The Associated Press)

    In China, politics remains a man’s world

    A glance at history suggests it is easier for a Chinese woman to orbit Earth than to land a spot on the highest rung of Chinese politics.


  • ** FILE ** Bo Xilai, then the Chongqing Communist Party secretary, attends a plenary session of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Sunday, March 11, 2012. (Associated Press)

    China says disgraced leader Bo expelled from party

    China's communist leadership expelled Bo Xilai from the ruling party Friday and sought to bury him with charges ranging from corruption to sexual affairs, aiming to sweep away their most damaging scandal in decades while finally scheduling their long-awaited leadership transition for November.


  • Inside China: Murder, Xi wrote

    The bizarre affair involving China's flamboyant princeling, former Chongqing Party chief Bo Xilai, continues to dazzle the world following Bo's unceremonious ouster as the regional communist viceroy on March 15.


  • BOOK REVIEW: Power struggle with a bloody end

    American politics can be vicious and un-principled, but they are not deadly. Defeated politicians join think tanks, give big-dollar speeches and plot campaign comebacks.


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