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11262014_ap4240846205208201.jpg

Rep. Jeff Miller, Florida Republican and chairman of the House Veterans' Affairs Committee said the agency has a "horrible track record" in managing major construction projects. (Associated Press)

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Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton listens before delivering keynote remarks at the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves summit, Friday Nov. 21, 2014, in New York. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

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President Barack Obama, center, with daughters Sasha, second from right, and Malia, right, carries on the Thanksgiving tradition of saving a turkey from the dinner table with a "presidential pardon" of 'Cheese' in the Grand Foyer of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014. Also with Cheese are Gary Cooper chairman of the National Turkey Federation and owner of Cooper Farms and his son Cole Cooper, far left. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

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Obama Turkey Pardon.JPEG-0edfc.jpg

President Barack Obama, right, with daughter Sasha, carries on the Thanksgiving tradition of saving a turkey from the dinner table with a "presidential pardon" of 'Cheese' in the Grand Foyer of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014. Also with Cheese are Gary Cooper, center, chairman of the National Turkey Federation and owner of Cooper Farms and his son Cole Cooper, far left. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

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Army medic.jpg

Soldiers rush a trauma victim to a U.S. Army medical helicopter in Tarmiyah, Iraq, Sept. 30, 2007. (U.S. Army)

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President Barack Obama addresses the crowd on issues surrounding the protests in Ferguson, Mo., after meeting with community leaders about the executive actions he is taking to fix the immigration system Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

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20141126-national-news-cover.jpg

National Edition News cover for November 26, 2014 - Fundraiser charged with child sex abuse met Obama often: Terrence Patrick Bean, 66, a prominent gay-rights activist and Democratic donor, was arrested Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014, and charged with two counts of third-degree sodomy and with third-degree sex abuse. (Photo: Multnomah County Sheriff's Office)

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Illustration on the negative impact of Obama's immigration action on black Americans by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

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Recent polls show that a majority of Democrats are ready for a Hillary Rodham Clinton 2016 presidential bid, but is Mrs. Clinton ready for the White House? (Associated Press)

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Obama Immigration.JPEG-06633.jpg

For President Obama, the new smog rules — dubbed "the most expensive regulation" in American history by manufacturing leaders — allow him to once again bask in the praise of the environmental community, which views this White House as perhaps the most consequential in U.S. history when it comes to its issues. (Associated Press)

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Illustration on the visible failings of Obama's economic policies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

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PQMonthlyAirForce1-500x357.jpg

Terrence Patrick Bean, 66, a prominent gay-rights activist and Democratic donor, talks with President Obama with Air Force One in July 2010. (PQ Monthly)

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cornel west.jpg

Princeton University Professor Cornel West mocked fellow civil rights activist Al Sharpton on Monday, accusing him of always wanting to be the center of attention on issues that affect the black community. (C-SPAN2 via National Review)

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bean3.jpg

Terrence Patrick Bean, 66, a prominent gay-rights activist and Democratic donor, was arrested Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014, and charged with two counts of third-degree sodomy and with third-degree sex abuse. (Photo: Multnomah County Sheriff's Office)

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Terrence-Patrick-Bean-112014.JPG

Terrence Patrick Bean, 66, a prominent gay rights activist and Democratic donor, was arrested Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014, and charged with two counts of third-degree sodomy and with third-degree sex abuse. (Photo: Multnomah County Sheriff's Office)

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Mauser-K98k-Carbine

MAUSER K98 - Karabiner 98 Kurz (Kar98k, K98, K98k) is a bolt action rifle chambered for the 7.92×57mm Mauser cartridge that was adopted in 1935 as the standard service rifle by the German Wehrmacht.[2] It was one of the final developments in the long line of Mauser military rifles. Although supplemented by semi- and fully automatic rifles during World War II, it remained the primary German service rifle until the end of World War II in 1945. Millions were captured by the Soviets at the conclusion of World War II and were widely distributed as military aid. The Karabiner 98k therefore continues to appear in conflicts across the world as they are taken out of storage during times of strife.

FN-FAL

FN-FAL

FN FAL - Fusil Automatic Leger (Light Automatic Rifle) or FAL is a semi-automatic, selective fire battle rifle produced by the Belgian armaments manufacturer Fabrique Nationale de Herstal (FN). During the Cold War it was adopted by many North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) countries, with the notable exception of the United States. It is one of the most widely used rifles in history, having been used by more than 90 countries. The FAL was predominantly chambered for the 7.62×51mm NATO round, and because of its prevalence and widespread use among the armed forces of many NATO countries during the Cold War it was nicknamed 'The right arm of the Free World.'

AP6906110223

AP6906110223

M14 - an American selective fire automatic rifle that fires  (.308 Winchester) ammunition. It gradually replaced the M1 Garand in U.S. Army service by 1961 and in U.S. Marine Corps service by 1965. It was the standard issue infantry rifle for U.S. military personnel in the Contiguous United States, Europe, and South Korea from 1959 until it was replaced by the M16 rifle in 1970. The M14 was used for U.S. Army, Coast Guard and Marine Corps basic and advanced individual training from the mid-1960s to the early 1970s. The M14 was the last American 'battle rifle' (weapons that fire full-power rifle ammunition) issued in quantity to U.S. military personnel. The rifle remains in limited service in all branches of the U.S. military as an accurized competition and sniping weapon. It is also used as a ceremonial weapon by honor guards, color guards, drill teams, and ceremonial guards. The M14 serves as the basis for the M21 and M25 sniper rifles. SP4 Michael Ferreira, left, Dallas, Tex., and SP4 David Booker, Geneva, Indiana, keep close watch during their guard duty tour on the Dak To perimeter with their M14 weapons in Vietnam on June 11, 1969. American defenders have beaten off enemy attacks in the area on 24 of the last 31 nights. (AP Photo/Cornu)

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AP6708020174

M16 - is the United States military select-fire adaptation of the AR-15 rifle. The rifle was adapted for semi-automatic and full-automatic fire. Colt purchased the rights to the AR-15 from ArmaLite, and currently uses that designation only for semi-automatic versions of the rifle. The M16 fires the 5.56;45mm NATO cartridge. The rifle entered United States Army service and was deployed for jungle warfare operations in South Vietnam in 1963, becoming the U.S. military's standard service rifle of the Vietnam War by 1969, replacing the M14 rifle in that role. The U.S. Army retained the M14 in CONUS, Europe, and South Korea until 1970. In 1983 with the USMC's adoption of the M16A2 (1986 for the US Army), the M16 rifle was modified for three-round bursts, with some later variants having all modes of fire and has been the primary service rifle of the U.S. armed forces. The M16 has also been widely adopted by other militaries around the world. Total worldwide production of M16s has been approximately 8 million, making it the most-produced firearm of its caliber. As of 2010, the U.S. Army is supplementing the M16 in combat units with the M4 carbine, which is a smaller version of the M16. A U.S. 9th. Infantry division soldier makes sure that his M16 rifle remains dry as he wades through monsoon-swollen stream in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam, August 2, 1967. The week of July 23-30, during a search and destroy operation about 20 miles southeast of Saigon. (AP Photo)

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Capt. Bryson McElyea, assigned to 24th Military Intelligence Battalion in Wiesbaden, Germany, fires the M16 rifle during United States Army Europe's Best Junior Officer Competition (BJOC) in Grafenwoehr, Germany, July 24, 2012. The BJOC, unique to the U.S. Army in Europe, is a training event for company-grade officers ranking from 2nd Lt. to Capt. meant to challenge and refine competitors' leadership and cognitive decision-making skills in a high-intensity environment. (U.S. Army photo by Visual Information Specialist Gertrud Zach/Released)