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FILE - This March 15, 2013 file photo shows former Massachusetts Gov., and 2012 Republican presidential candidate, Mitt Romney at the 40th annual Conservative Political Action Conference in National Harbor, Md. Romney told "Fox News Sunday" that he has accepted an apology from MSNBC host Melissa Harris-Perry, who joked about a Christmas picture that included the 2012 Republican presidential candidate's adopted, African-American grandson. Romney said that he sees Melissa Harris-Perry's apology as sincere and is ready to move on. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

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**FILE** Senate Armed Services Committee member Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, questions former Nebraska Republican Sen. Chuck Hagel, President Obama's choice to lead the Pentagon, during his confirmation hearing before the committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

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FILE - In this Jan. 19, 1999 file-pool photo, President Bill Clinton gestures while giving his State of the Union address on Capitol Hill in Washington. Is “strong” losing its strength? Presidents of both parties have long felt compelled to sum up the state of the union with a descriptive word or two in their State of the Union addresses. Mostly the same word. For many years now, “strong” has been the go-to adjective. Vice President Gore, left, and House Speaker Dennis Hastert of Ill. listen. (AP Photo/Win McNamee, File-Pool)

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FILE - In this Jan. 8, 2014 file photo, Ohio Gov. John Kasich speaks about a new drug abuse prevention initiative being started for the state at West Carrollton Middle School in West Carrollton, Ohio. Kasich seemed at first to relish the idea he'd be a one-term governor, having presumably alienated partisans, lobbyists, unions and voters as he made painful but necessary changes to government operations. More recently, the 61-year-old Republican has taken on a more conciliatory, politically moderate approach that observers say could be intended to position him for re-election in his perennially purple state or for a repeat run for president. (AP Photo/Al Behrman, File)