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Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa sings during his weekly live broadcast, "Enlace Ciudadano," or "Citizen Link," in Manta, Ecuador, on Saturday, June 29, 2013. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

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Ecuador NSA Surveilla_Lea.jpg

** FILE ** Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa sings during his weekly live broadcast, "Enlace Ciudadano," or "Citizen Link," in Manta, Ecuador, on Saturday, June 29, 2013. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

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Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa casts his vote for National Assembly members in Quito, Ecuador, on Sunday, Feb. 17, 2013. Voters were electing the president, vice president and National Assembly members, with Mr. Correa highly favored to win a second re-election. His government has won broad backing from the lower classes as it leads Latin America in social spending. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)

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Ecuador Election_Lea.jpg

Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa casts his vote for National Assembly members in Quito, Ecuador, on Sunday, Feb. 17, 2013. Voters were electing the president, vice president and National Assembly members, with Mr. Correa highly favored to win a second re-election. His government has won broad backing from the lower classes as it leads Latin America in social spending. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)

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This two picture combo shows from left; a Feb. 1, 2012, file photo of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange as he arrives at the Supreme Court in London, and a June 20, 2012, photo of Ecuador's President Rafael Correa during a meeting at the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, or Rio+20, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Left photo — AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File; right photo — AP Photo/Victor Caivano, File)

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This two picture combo shows from left; a Feb. 1, 2012, file photo of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange as he arrives at the Supreme Court in London, and a June 20, 2012, photo of Ecuador's President Rafael Correa during a meeting at the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, or Rio+20, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Left photo — AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File; right photo — AP Photo/Victor Caivano, File)

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Illustration: Rafael Correa by Linas Garsys for The Washington Times

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Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa said Latin America should adopt sanctions against Great Britain. (Associated Press)

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Ecuadorean backers of President Rafael Correa wave flags with his image at a rally in late October. Mr. Correa has been criticized by human rights groups and others as intolerant of dissent, but he's popular among many Ecuadoreans. (Associated Press)

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ASSOCIATED PRESS In February, Ecuador President Rafael Correa sued two journalists for defamation after railing against some in the profession as "true assassins with pens ... those who kill the dignity, the honor, of people." He is putting a ballot question before his nation's voters on Saturday that would restrict news media ownership and put the executive in charge of regulating media content.

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With a gas mask on his head, Ecuador's President Rafael Correa, center, gestures as he runs away from tear gas during a protest of police officers and soldiers against a new law that cuts their benefits at a police base in Quito, Ecuador, Thursday, Sept. 30, 2010. There were no reports of serious violence against the government, but Correa was hospitalized due to the effects of tear gas after being shouted down and pelted with water as he tried to speak with a group of police protesters. (AP Photo/Patricio Realpe)

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Supporters of Ecuador's President Rafael Correa protest against rebellious police outside the hospital where Ecuador's President Rafael Correa is located in Quito, Ecuador, Thursday Sept. 30, 2010. The government declared a state of siege Thursday after rebellious police, angered by a law that cuts their benefits, shut down airports and blocked highways in a nationwide strike. (AP Photo/Patricio Realpe)

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Ecuador's President Rafael Correa, right, speaks to a demonstrator during a protest of police officers and soldiers against a new law that cuts their benefits at a police base in Quito, Ecuador, Thursday, Sept. 30, 2010. Hundreds of police protesting the new law plunged the country into chaos on Thursday, shutting down airports and blocking highways in a nationwide strike. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)

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Supporters of Ecuador's President Rafael Correa, carrying a poster of Correa, protest against rebellious police outside the hospital where Correa is located in Quito, Ecuador, Thursday Sept. 30, 2010. The government declared a state of siege Thursday after rebellious police, angered by a law that cuts their benefits, shut down airports and blocked highways in a nationwide strike. (AP Photo/Patricio Realpe)

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A presidential guard, third from left, is taken away by protesting police outside the hospital where Ecuador's President Rafael Correa is located in Quito, Ecuador, Thursday Sept. 30, 2010. The government declared a state of siege Thursday after rebellious police angered by a law that cuts their benefits shut down airports and blocked highways in a nationwide strike. (AP Photo/Patricio Realpe)

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Ecuador's President Rafael Correa, center, covers his head as he runs away from tear gas during a protest of police officers and soldiers against a new law that cuts their benefits at a police base in Quito, Ecuador, Thursday, Sept. 30, 2010. There were no reports of serious violence against the government, but Correa was hospitalized due to the effects of tear gas after being shouted down and pelted with water as he tried to speak with a group of police protesters. (AP Photo/Patricio Realpe)

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Ecuador's President Rafael Correa, center, wearing a gas mask, is caught in the middle of a police protest at a police base in Quito, Ecuador, Thursday Sept. 30, 2010. The government declared a state of siege Thursday after rebellious police, angered by a law that cuts their benefits, shut down airports and blocked highways in a nationwide strike. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)

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Ecuador's President Rafael Correa, sitting in a wheelchair and wearing a gas mask, is rescued from a hospital where he was holed up by protesting police in Quito, Ecuador, Thursday Sept. 30, 2010. The army rescued Correa from a hospital where he had been trapped by rebellious police for more than 12 hours while he was being treated for tear-gas fired by hundreds of police angry over a law that they claim would cut their benefits. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)

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Soldiers enter the police hospital where Ecuador's President Rafael Correa is being holed up by protesting police in Quito, Ecuador, Thursday Sept. 30, 2010. The army rescued Correa from the hospital where he had been trapped by rebellious police for more than 12 hours while he was being treated for tear-gas fired by hundreds of police angry over a law that they claim would cut their benefits. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)

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Soldiers arrive to enter the police hospital where Ecuador's President Rafael Correa is being holed up by protesting police in Quito, Ecuador, Thursday Sept. 30, 2010. The army rescued Correa from the hospital where he had been trapped by rebellious police for more than 12 hours while he was being treated for tear-gas fired by hundreds of police angry over a law that they claim would cut their benefits. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)