Ramzi Binalshibh

Latest Ramzi Binalshibh Items
  • FILE - In this Dec. 7, 2006 file photo reviewed by the U.S. Military, a U.S. soldier keeps watch from a guard tower overlooking Camp Delta detention center on Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base in Cuba. Lawyers for Guantanamo prisoners charged in the Sept. 11 attack say the FBI has questioned more people who work as support staff on their legal teams than previously disclosed, a development that may prompt a new detour in an already snarled case when the war crimes tribunal reconvenes Monday at the U.S. base in Cuba. A judge will consider a delay in the proceedings in a hearing on Monday, June 16, 2014. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

    Judge drops 1 of 5 defendants from 9/11 Gitmo case; Ramzi Binalshibh to get his own war crimes trial

    A military judge has ruled that one of five prisoners at the Guantanamo Bay naval base charged in the Sept. 11 attack should be tried separately from his co-defendants.


  • FILE - In this Aug. 23, 2013 pool file photo reviewed by the U.S. Department of Defense, one of Guantanamo Bay's two courthouses is seen through a broken window at Camp Justice at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, Cuba. On Monday, April 14, 2014 a judge in Guantanamo will open a hearing into the sanity of prisoner Ramzi Binalshibh, whose courtroom outbursts about alleged mistreatment in Camp 7 have halted the effort to try five men in the Sept. 11 attacks, all of whom are held there. (AP Photo/Toronto Star, Michelle Shephard, Pool, File)

    Window opens on secret camp within Guantanamo

    Attorney James Connell has visited his client inside the secret Guantanamo prison complex known as Camp 7 only once, taken in a van with covered windows on a circuitous trek to disguise the route on the scrub brush-and-cactus covered military base.


  • **FILE** Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the alleged Sept. 11 mastermind, is seen shortly after his capture during a raid in Pakistan in this photo from March 1, 2003. (Associated Press)

    Sept. 11 case back before Gitmo war crimes court

    Five Guantanamo prisoners charged in the Sept. 11 attacks returned before a military tribunal Monday, forgoing the protest that turned their last appearance into an unruly 13-hour spectacle.


  • **FILE** This July 2009 photo downloaded from the Arabic language web site www.muslm.net shows a man identified by the site as Khalid Sheik Mohammed, the accused mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks, in detention at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The picture was allegedly taken by the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and released only to the detainee's family. An Obama administration official said Friday that Mohammed and four other Guantanamo Bay detainees will be sent to New York to face trial in a civilian federal court. (Associated Press/www.muslm.net)

    5 charged in 9/11 attack resist Gitmo hearing

    The self-proclaimed mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks repeatedly declined to answer a judge's questions Saturday and his co-defendants knelt in prayer in what appeared to be a concerted protest against the military proceedings.


  • **FILE** The sun rises May 13, 2009, over the Guantanamo detention facility at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, Cuba. (Associated Press)

    Sept. 11 case returns to Guantanamo tribunal

    Five men accused of orchestrating the Sept. 11 attacks, including the self-proclaimed mastermind, are headed back to a military tribunal at Guantanamo Bay on Saturday, more than three years after President Obama put the case on hold in a failed effort to move the proceedings to a civilian court and close the prison at the U.S. base in Cuba.


  • In this undated photo provided by global security research and analysis enterprise Flashpoint Partners, a man who Flashpoint has identified as confessed 9/11 architect Ramzi Binalshibh is shown. Binalshibh is being held pending trial at a U.S. military facility in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. (AP Photo/Flashpoint Partners)

    Interrogation tapes of 9/11 plotter found under CIA desk

    The CIA has tapes of 9/11 plotter Ramzi Binalshibh being interrogated in a secret overseas prison. Discovered under a desk, the recordings could provide an unparalleled look at how foreign governments aided the U.S. in holding and questioning suspected terrorists.


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