Topic - Raymond Allen Davis

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  • An undated family photo provided by Rebecca Davis of Raymond Davis, 36. Raymond Davis, who shot and killed two Pakistani men, was released from Pakistan prison Wednesday, March 16, 2011, and left Pakistan after more than $2 million was paid to his victims' families, defusing a dispute that threatened an alliance vital to defeating al Qaeda and ending the Afghan war. (AP Photo/courtesy of Rebecca Davis)

    CIA contractor release eases Pakistan-U.S. tensions

    A "blood money" deal to free a CIA contractor who killed two Pakistani men removes a major thorn in relations between the United States and Pakistan, but bruising from the incident and disagreements over Afghanistan mean the alliance will likely remain stormy.

  • ** FILE ** Raymond Allen Davis is escorted to a court in Lahore, Pakistan, in January 2011. (Associated Press)

    Slain men's kin, paid $2M, 'pardon' CIA contractor

    A CIA contractor accused of murdering two Pakistani men walked out of a Lahore prison Wednesday after the families of the dead men "pardoned" him after receiving more than $2 million in blood money, officials said.

  • Pakistani protesters burn tires during a demonstration against the release of Raymond Allen Davis, an American CIA contractor, on Wednesday, March 16, 2011, in Lahore, Pakistan. Mr. Davis, who said he shot and killed two Pakistani men in self-defense, was released from prison after the United States paid "blood money" to the families of the victims, apparently defusing what had been a major row between Washington and Islamabad, Pakistani officials said. (AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary)

    'Blood money' frees CIA contractor in Pakistan

    A CIA contractor who shot and killed two Pakistani men was freed from prison on Wednesday after the United States paid $2.34 million in "blood money" to the victims' families, Pakistani officials said.

  • Marc Grossman (left), the new U.S. special envoy to Afghanistan and Pakistan, meets with Pakistani Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani in Islamabad, Pakistan, on Monday, March 7, 2011. Mr. Grossman is on his first trip to the region since taking the position formerly held by the late Richard Holbrooke. (AP Photo/Anjum Naveed)

    Pakistan president tells U.S. envoy ties must stay strong

    Pakistan and the United States cannot afford any downturn in their relationship, President Asif Ali Zardari told the new U.S. envoy to Pakistan and Afghanistan on Monday amid a dispute over a detained American CIA contractor.

  • Security is beefed up Thursday outside the central jail in Lahore, Pakistan, where a trial court said it would proceed with the murder trial of CIA contractor Raymond Allen Davis. (Associated Press)

    Pakistani trial for CIA employee to go on

    A Pakistani court said Thursday it would proceed with the trial of an American CIA contractor arrested for fatally shooting two Pakistanis, but it held off on charging him, lawyers for both sides said. They said the court also said there was no evidence that Raymond Allen Davis had diplomatic immunity as his lawyers and Washington insist.

  • ** FILE ** Pakistani security officials escort Raymond Allen Davis (center), a U.S. Consulate employee, to a local court in Lahore, Pakistan, on Friday, Jan. 28, 2011. (AP Photo/Hamza Ahmed, File)

    American CIA contractor appears in Pakistani court

    An American CIA employee accused of murdering two Pakistanis appeared handcuffed in a Pakistani court on Friday, where he refused to sign a charge sheet after claiming diplomatic immunity, officials said.

  • Ex-CIA man urges U.S. to pay to free contractor

    A former CIA senior officer is urging the Obama administration to pay "blood money" to the families of two Pakistani men who were killed by a CIA contractor in order to win his freedom from Pakistani authorities holding him in a murder probe.

  • ** FILE ** Pakistani security officials escort Raymond Allen Davis (center), a U.S. Consulate employee, to a local court in Lahore, Pakistan, on Friday, Jan. 28, 2011. (AP Photo/Hamza Ahmed, File)

    Arrested U.S. official is actually CIA contractor

    An American jailed in Pakistan for the fatal shooting of two armed men was working secretly for the CIA and scouting a neighborhood when he was arrested, a disclosure likely to further frustrate U.S. efforts to free the man and strain relations between the two countries.

  • Pakistan seeks to ease furor over American held in killings

    Legal analysts in Pakistan's government widely believe that an American detained in the killing of two Pakistanis has diplomatic immunity but that a court should decide his fate, an official said Tuesday.

  • ** FILE ** Pakistani security officials escort Raymond Allen Davis (center), a U.S. Consulate employee, to a local court in Lahore, Pakistan, on Friday, Jan. 28, 2011. (AP Photo/Hamza Ahmed, File)

    Pakistan softens on issue of American's immunity

    Pakistan will tell a court that most of its legal experts believe a detained American has diplomatic immunity, but will leave it to a judge to rule on his status, an official said Tuesday — a sign that Islamabad is trying to give the U.S. an opening to free the man while avoiding domestic backlash.

  • ** FILE ** Pakistani security officials escort Raymond Allen Davis (center), a U.S. Consulate employee, to a local court in Lahore, Pakistan, on Friday, Jan. 28, 2011. (AP Photo/Hamza Ahmed, File)

    Pakistan: U.S. shooting case won't derail talks

    Pakistan's standoff with Washington over a jailed U.S. Embassy worker will not thwart talks between the two countries and Afghanistan, a Pakistani government spokesman said Sunday.

  • ** FILE ** Pakistani security officials escort Raymond Allen Davis (center), a U.S. Consulate employee, to a local court in Lahore, Pakistan, on Friday, Jan. 28, 2011. (AP Photo/Hamza Ahmed, File)

    Pakistan judge extends detention of American

    Pakistani police on Friday accused an American held in a pair of shootings of committing "cold-blooded murder," while a judge ordered the man's detention extended for 14 days and asked the Pakistani government to clarify if he has diplomatic immunity.

  • An armored car carrying a U.S. consular employee suspected in the shooting of two Pakistanis leaves a court in Lahore, Pakistan, on Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011. A judge ruled that police can keep holding the American, identified by Pakistanis as Raymond Allen Davis, for at least eight more days, officials said. (AP Photo/Hamza Ahmed)

    Pakistani judge orders American held 8 more days

    A judge ruled Thursday that police can keep holding a U.S. Embassy employee accused of killing two Pakistanis for at least eight more days, officials said — the latest development in a case that has heightened tensions between the United States and Pakistan.

  • Supporters of a Pakistani socio-political group, Pasban, protest against a U.S. consular employee suspected in the shooting deaths of two Pakistani men in Lahore on Thursday, in Karachi, Pakistan, Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2011. A Pakistani court ordered the government Tuesday not to release the American official despite U. S. insistence that he has diplomatic immunity and has been detained illegally. (AP Photo/Shakil Adil)

    Pakistani court blocks release of American suspect

    A Pakistani court ordered the government Tuesday not to release an American official arrested in the shooting deaths of two Pakistanis despite U.S. insistence that he has diplomatic immunity and has been detained illegally.

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Quotations
  • "Instead, let us look for renewal."

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  • Mr. Davis last month, as Pakistani media reported that the United States paid more than $2 million in "blood money" to the relatives of the dead men.

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