Topic - Robert Bales

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  • Staff Sgt. Robert Bales: Sorry for ‘cowardice’ in killing 16 Afghani villagers

    The American staff sergeant who went on a shooting rampage and killed 16 villagers while serving in Afghanistan apologized for his actions during Thursday court testimony, saying he was stoked on steroids and alcohol and plagued by fear and insecurity.

  • **FILE** In this courtroom sketch, Staff Sgt. Robert Bales (left) appears before Judge Col. Jeffery Nance in a courtroom at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., on Aug. 20, 2013, during a sentencing hearing in the slayings of 16 civilians killed during pre-dawn raids on two villages on March 11, 2012. (Associated Press)

    Staff Sgt. Bales apologizes for Afghan massacre

    The U.S. soldier who massacred 16 Afghan civilians during pre-dawn raids last year apologized for the first time for his "act of cowardice," but could not explain the atrocities to a military jury considering whether he should one day have a shot at freedom.

  • In this courtroom sketch, Haji Mohammad Naim testifies Aug. 20, 2013, in a courtroom at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, south of Seattle. Naim, an Afghan farmer shot during a massacre in Kandahar Province last year, took the witness stand at a sentencing hearing for Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, who attacked his village and one other in pre-dawn raids on March 11, 2012, killing 16 civilians. (Associated Press)

    Afghan massacre victim takes stand, curses gunman

    An Afghan farmer shot during a massacre in Kandahar Province last year took the witness stand Tuesday against the U.S. soldier who attacked his village, cursing him before breaking down and pleading with the prosecutor not to ask him any more questions.

  • **FILE** In this photo provided by the Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System, Sgt. Robert Bales takes part in exercises at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., on Aug. 23, 2011. (Associated Press/DVIDS, Spc. Ryan Hallock)

    Army: Soldier, wife laughed about killing charges

    Army prosecutors said Monday they have a recording of a phone call in which Staff Sgt. Robert Bales and his wife laugh as they review the charges filed against him in the killing of 16 Afghan villagers.

  • ** FILE ** Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales participates in an exercise at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., on Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011. (AP Photo/Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System, Spc. Ryan Hallock)

    U.S. Army sergeant charged in 16 Afghan killings pleads guilty

    The U.S. soldier who was charged with going on a shooting spree and killing 16 Afghan civilians pleaded guilty Wednesday.

  • ** FILE ** Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales participates in an exercise at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., on Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011. (AP Photo/Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System, Spc. Ryan Hallock)

    U.S. soldier pleads guilty in Afghan massacre

    The American soldier charged with killing 16 Afghan civilians during nighttime raids on two villages last year pleaded guilty Wednesday to avoid the death penalty, setting the stage for him to recount the horrific slaughter in a military courtroom.

  • **FILE** In this photo provided by the Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System, Sgt. Robert Bales takes part in exercises at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., on Aug. 23, 2011. (Associated Press/DVIDS, Spc. Ryan Hallock)

    U.S. soldier accused of killing 16 Afghanis strikes deal to avoid death penalty

    Lawyers for Robert Bales, the U.S. soldier who stands accused of killing 16 citizens while in Afghanistan, say he has struck a plea deal with prosecutors to avoid the death penalty.

  • ** FILE ** Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales participates in an exercise at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., on Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011. (AP Photo/Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System, Spc. Ryan Hallock)

    U.S. Army seeks death penalty in Afghan massacre case

    The U.S. Army said Wednesday it will seek the death penalty against the soldier accused of killing 16 Afghan villagers in a predawn rampage in March.

  • Kari Bales (third from right) stands next to attorney Lance Rosen (third from left) as she listens to her sister, Stephanie Tandberg (second from right), read a statement to reporters on Nov. 13, 2012, outside the building housing a military courtroom on Joint Base Lewis McChord in Washington state, where a preliminary hearing ended for Kari's husband, U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales. Bales is accused of 16 counts of premeditated murder and six counts of attempted murder for a pre-dawn attack on two villages in Kandahar Province in Afghanistan in March of 2012. At right is Stephanie's husband, Eric Tandberg. (Associated Press)

    Preliminary hearing ends in Afghan massacre case

    Army prosecutors on Tuesday asked an investigative officer to recommend a death penalty court-martial for an Army staff sergeant accused of killing 16 Afghan villagers in a predawn rampage, saying that Staff Sgt. Robert Bales committed "heinous and despicable crimes."

  • **FILE** In this courtroom sketch, U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales (center) is shown Nov. 5, 2012, during a preliminary hearing in a military courtroom at Joint Base Lewis McChord in Washington state. An Afghan National Army guard who reported seeing a U.S. soldier outside a remote base the night 16 civilians were massacred in March said the man did not stop even after being asked three times to do so. (Associated Press)

    Afghans find hope for justice in video testimony

    Through a video monitor in a military courtroom near Seattle, Staff Sgt. Robert Bales saw young Afghan girls smile beneath bright head coverings before they described the bloodbath he's accused of committing. From the other side of that video link, in Afghanistan, another man saw something else: signs that justice will be done.

  • In this detail of a courtroom sketch, U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales (seated at front right) listens on Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, during a preliminary hearing in a military courtroom at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state. Sgt. Bales is accused of 16 counts of premeditated murder and six counts of attempted murder for a pre-dawn attack on two villages in Kandahar province in Afghanistan in March 2012. At upper right is Col. Lee Deneke, the investigating officer, and seated at front left is Sgt. Bales' civilian attorney, Emma Scanlan. (AP Photo/Lois Silver)

    Victims testify about details of Afghan massacre

    Stories of the massacre came, one by one, over a live video link from Afghanistan into a military courtroom outside Seattle: torched bodies, a son finding his wounded father, boys cowering behind a curtain while others screamed "We are children! We are children!"

  • In this detail of a courtroom sketch, U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales (seated at front right) listens on Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, during a preliminary hearing in a military courtroom at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state. Sgt. Bales is accused of 16 counts of premeditated murder and six counts of attempted murder for a pre-dawn attack on two villages in Kandahar province in Afghanistan in March 2012. At upper right is Col. Lee Deneke, the investigating officer, and seated at front left is Sgt. Bales' civilian attorney, Emma Scanlan. (AP Photo/Lois Silver)

    Details emerge in Afghan village massacre

    Staff Sgt. Robert Bales spent the evening on his remote outpost in southern Afghanistan with fellow soldiers, watching a movie about revenge killings, sharing whiskey from a plastic bottle and discussing an attack that cost one of their friends his leg.

  • In this detail of a courtroom sketch, U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales (seated at front right) listens on Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, during a preliminary hearing in a military courtroom at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state. Sgt. Bales is accused of 16 counts of premeditated murder and six counts of attempted murder for a pre-dawn attack on two villages in Kandahar province in Afghanistan in March 2012. At upper right is Col. Lee Deneke, the investigating officer, and seated at front left is Sgt. Bales' civilian attorney, Emma Scanlan. (AP Photo/Lois Silver)

    Defense set to begin in Afghan massacre case

    Staff Sgt. Robert Bales was largely calm and compliant when he turned himself in following a predawn massacre at two Afghan villages in March, witnesses testified Tuesday.

  • **FILE** In this photo provided by the Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System, Sgt. Robert Bales takes part in exercises at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., on Aug. 23, 2011. (Associated Press/DVIDS, Spc. Ryan Hallock)

    Prosecutor: U.S. soldier had blood of Afghan victims on him

    The soldier accused of killing 16 villagers in a nighttime rampage in Afghanistan returned to his base wearing a cape and with the blood of his victims on his rifle, belt, shirt and pants, a military prosecutor said Monday.

  • American Scene: Man with bionic right leg
 climbs Chicago skyscraper

    The metal on Zac Vawter's bionic leg gleamed as he climbed 103 floors of Chicago’s Willis Tower, becoming the first person ever to complete the task wearing a mind-controlled prosthetic limb.

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