Topic - Robert Edwards

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  • This Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014 photo shows a Lindenhurst, N.Y., home where police say a 21-year-old and a teenage girl described as a runaway were held against their will and forced to work as prostitutes. Police raided the home on Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014 and charged Andy Gayot, 35, with numerous crimes related to the alleged scheme. (AP Photo/Frank Eltman)

    NY police: Man held 2 women captive for months

    A 21-year-old woman and a teenage girl described as a runaway were forced to work as prostitutes and prevented from leaving a suburban New York home - one allegedly for more than a year - before authorities rescued them and arrested the man suspected of keeping them captive, police said Wednesday.

  • Citation excerpts for 2010 Nobel medicine prize

    Excerpts from the citation awarding the 2010 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine to Robert Edwards for the development of human in vitro fertilization, or IVF, therapy.

  • In this July 12, 2008 photo British physiologist Robert Edwards, left, attends the 30th anniversary of the world's first "test tube" fertilization baby Louise Joy Brown, right, holding her son Cameron. At centre left is her mother, Lesley Brown, at the Bourn Hall, in Bourn, England. A British scientist who developed test tube fertilization and gave thousands of infertile couples the chance to have children, has received the 2010 Nobel Prize in medicine, it was announced on Monday, Oct. 4, 2010. Starting in the 1950's, Robert Edwards and Patrick Steptoe developed the so-called IVF technology where egg cells are fertilized by sperm outside the body. Steptoe died in 1988. (AP Photo/Chris Radburn, PA)

    Test-tube baby pioneer Edwards wins medicine Nobel

    Robert Edwards of Britain won the 2010 Nobel Prize in medicine on Monday for developing in-vitro fertilization, a breakthrough that ignited heated controversy in the 1970s but has helped millions of infertile couples since then have children.

  • In this July 12, 2008 photo British physiologist Robert Edwards, left, attends the 30th anniversary of the world's first "test tube" fertilization baby Louise Joy Brown, right, holding her son Cameron. At centre left is her mother, Lesley Brown, at the Bourn Hall, in Bourn, England. A British scientist who developed test tube fertilization and gave thousands of infertile couples the chance to have children, has received the 2010 Nobel Prize in medicine, it was announced on Monday, Oct. 4, 2010. Starting in the 1950's, Robert Edwards and Patrick Steptoe developed the so-called IVF technology where egg cells are fertilized by sperm outside the body. Steptoe died in 1988. (AP Photo/Chris Radburn, PA)

    In-vitro UK pioneer Edwards wins medicine Nobel

    Robert Edwards of Britain won the 2010 Nobel Prize in medicine on Monday for developing in vitro fertilization, a breakthrough that has helped millions of infertile couples have children but also ignited an enduring controversy with religious groups.

  • FILE- British Professor Robert Edwards, in this file photo dated Thursday, May. 19, 2005, whose pioneering work led to the birth of the world's first 'test tube baby', seen in London, England. Test-tube baby pioneer Robert Edwards of Britain has won the 2010 Nobel Prize in medicine it is announced Monday Oct. 4, 2010. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

    IVF pioneer Edwards wins Nobel medicine prize

    Robert Edwards of Britain won the 2010 Nobel Prize in medicine on Monday for the development of in-vitro fertilization, a breakthrough that has helped millions of infertile couples to have children.

  • ** FILE ** Robert Edwards of Great Britain has won the 2010 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

    Vatican official: Nobel to IVF pioneer raises questions

    The Vatican's top bioethics official said Robert Edwards, who received the Nobel Prize in medicine Monday for developing in-vitro fertilization, opened "a new and important chapter in the field of human reproduction" but is also responsible for the destruction of embryos and the creation of a "market" in donor eggs.

  • Nobel Prize given for test tube baby research

    The Nobel Prize in medicine went to a man whose work led to the first test tube baby, an achievement that helped bring 4 million infants into the world and raised challenging new questions about human reproduction.

  • Robert Edwards, the British pioneer of IVF treatment, sits with two of his 'test-tube-babies', Sophie and Jack Emery who celebrate their second birthday in London in this file photo dated Monday July 20, 1998. Dr. Edwards of Britain has won the 2010 Nobel Prize in medicine, it was announced Monday Oct. 4, 2010. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, File)

    Test-tube baby pioneer Edwards wins Nobel for medicine

    Robert Edwards of Britain won the 2010 Nobel Prize in medicine on Monday for developing in-vitro fertilization, a breakthrough that ignited heated controversy in the 1970s but has helped millions of infertile couples since then have children.

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