Topic - Robert Sarvis

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  • Republican gubernatorial candidate, Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli, delivers his concession speech during a rally in Richmond, Va., Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2013. Cuccinelli was defeated by Democrat Terry McAuliffe. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

    EDITORIAL: A lame result in Virginia

    The days following an election are spent reflecting on the lessons drawn from what went wrong and what went right. For Virginia Republicans, not much went right. For Democrats, just enough went right to win.

  • Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate, Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli and his wife Teiro leave the polling station after casting their votes at Brentsville District High School in Nokesville, Va., Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2013. Cuccinelli faces Democrat Terry McAuliffe in today's election. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

    Ken Cuccinelli: Tea-leaf reading is for the pundits

    Virginia Attorney General Kenneth T. Cuccinelli II, who cast his own ballot in the Virginia governor's race Tuesday morning, says he's still making calls to undecided voters and that reading tea leaves on any broader implications for the race is best left to the professional prognosticators.

  • Terry McAuliffe (left) makes nice with rival Kenneth T. Cuccinelli II after their final governor's debate Thursday at Virginia Tech. (associated press)

    CURL: Virginia voters: Time for something futile and stupid

    On Nov. 5, Virginia will hold its Tuesday Night Football game. Might be on Spike. Check your TV listings. Why the Land of Presidents holds its gubernatorial elections in off years — no presidential or congressional races on the ballot — is anyone's guess. Maybe state lawmakers want to see just how few voters will go to the polls.

  • President Obama appears at a campaign rally with supporters for Virginia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe (left) at Washington-Lee High School in Arlington, Va., on Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

    Obama: McAuliffe 'a man who knows how to work'; Virginia governor's race winds down

    "This is a referendum on Obamacare," Republican Kenneth T. Cuccinelli told a crowd of supporters outside a GOP office in Prince William County on Saturday, drawing scattered catcalls when he mentioned the president's upcoming appearance with Mr. McAuliffe.

  • ** FILE ** This photo taken Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2013, shows Virginia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe gesturing during an interview in Richmond, Va. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

    Terry McAuliffe up 7 points in Virginia governor's race: poll

    Democrat Terry McAuliffe maintains a 7-point edge over Republican Attorney General Kenneth T. Cuccinelli II in the race to be Virginia's next governor, with Libertarian Robert Sarvis still pulling numbers that suggest he could influence the final outcome of the closely watched contest on Tuesday.

  •  Virginia Democratic gubernatorial candidate, Terry McAuliffe speaks during a rally in Charlottesville, Va., Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013. McAulioffe was joined by former President Bill Clinton who has attended rallies around the state to give his support to McAuliffe, who is running for governor of Virginia.   (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

    Terry McAuliffe goes AWOL for Virginia students and media

    In April, the gubernatorial campaigns of Democrat Terry McAuliffe and Republican Kenneth T. Cuccinelli II were asked if they would provide videotaped responses to five questions from high school students across Virginia. But two weeks ago, Mr. McAuliffe abruptly backed out.

  • Illustration by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times

    PARISI: No room for a spoiler

    Libertarians could wake up, save Virginia from McAuliffe

  • Anna Nunnelly, 17, from Glen Allen, VA., laughs as she shakes hands with Ken Cuccinelli during a campaign stop, in Glen Allen, VA., Wednesday, October 30, 2013.  (Andrew S Geraci/The Washington Times)

    McAuliffe, Cuccinelli try to swing Libertarian vote in Virginia race for governor

    With some polls showing the Virginia governor’s race tightening in its final days, Republicans and Democrats are looking to manipulate a bloc of libertarian voters who have withheld their support from the major parties but who could swing the hotly contested race if they return to the fold for Election Day.

  • Democratic gubernatorial candidate, Terry McAuliffe speaks during a debate at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va., Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

    EDITORIAL: The Sarvis factor

    Apart from death and taxes, few things in life are certain. But one of them is that third-party candidates nearly always lose. Sometimes a third-party candidate can be a positive influence in the race, and sometimes not. Robert Sarvis, the candidate of the Libertarian Party, can only contribute to the prospects of Terry McAuliffe, the Democratic nominee.

  • Democrat Terry McAuliffe (left) and Virginia Attorney General Kenneth T. Cuccinelli II face off in the last debate between the two gubernatorial candidates Thursday. (associated press)

    Cuccinelli's hopes ride on debate

    Republican Kenneth T. Cuccinelli II will get his last shot to go toe-to-toe with Terry McAuliffe on Thursday in the third and final debate of the Virginia governor's race. But the Democrat, with a modest lead in polling and an outsize advantage in money, will likely be content simply to avoid any cringeworthy gaffes.

  • "The truth is our friend," Kenneth T. Cuccinelli II, Virginia's attorney general and Republican candidate for governor, says of his optimism that he can close the polling gap with Democrat Terry McAuliffe before Election Day. (Andrew S. Geraci/The Washington Times)

    Cuccinelli certain he can prevail after a Virginia campaign filled with 'lying'

    Virginia Attorney General Kenneth T. Cuccinelli II cast himself as "the most pro-liberty elected statewide official in my lifetime" heading into the final weeks of Virginia's gubernatorial campaign.

  • EDITORIAL: No spoilers in Virginia

    The Libertarian Party candidate for governor in Virginia is upset because he won't be invited to participate in a debate at Virginia Tech later this month. Fans of smaller government can feel relieved, because all that Robert Sarvis can accomplish by his futile run is to take enough votes away from Ken Cuccinelli, the conservative, to lose to Terry McAuliffe, a big-government liberal.

  • ** FILE ** Virginia gubernatorial candidates Democrat Terry McAuliffe (left) and Republican Attorney General Kenneth T. Cuccinelli II. (Associated Press)

    Shutdown seen helping McAuliffe, hurting Cuccinelli

    The federal government shutdown has seen Democrat Terry McAuliffe pad his lead in the Virginia governor's race against Republican Attorney General Kenneth T. Cuccinelli II, whose favorability rating in one new poll is lower than Sen. Ted Cruz, the Texas Republican who has become the principal face of the congressional impasse.

  • **FILE** Terry McAuliffe (The Washington Times)

    McAuliffe up 3 percentage points over Cuccinelli in new poll

    Democrat Terry McAuliffe holds a 44 percent to 41 percent lead over Republican Kenneth T. Cuccinelli II in the race for Virginia governor, with Libertarian candidate Robert Sarvis pulling 7 percent of the vote, according to a poll released Wednesday.

  • Virginia gubernatorial candidates Democrat Terry McAuliffe (left) and Republican Kenneth T. Cuccinelli II meet before a luncheon Thursday sponsored by the Virginia Public Access Project in Richmond.
(The Richmond Times-Dispatch via Associated Press

    McAuliffe holds slight edge over Cuccinelli in Virginia governor's race: poll

    A poll released Tuesday suggests that Democrat Terry McAuliffe and Republican Kenneth T. Cuccinelli II have lost support since January and the number of undecided voters in Virginia is climbing modestly — a signal, pollsters say, that respondents might be dissatisfied with their options in the governor's race.

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Quotations
  • But Mr. Sarvis lays out a simple path to victory over the two universally despised candidates: "If everybody who's voting against the other guy actually voted against both of them, I would win in a landslide," he said with a laugh last week in an interview. "People feel locked into a two-party system, but the fact of the matter is — we don't have to do it that way."

    CURL: Virginia voters: Time for something futile and stupid →

  • "I realized that the Republican Party, at least in Virginia, in the current era, is not a good vehicle for liberty candidates," he told the Richmond Times-Dispatch, which this year has refused to endorse a candidate. "Republicans are very strident on personal issues."

    CURL: Virginia voters: Time for something futile and stupid →

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