Topic - Robin Bell

Subscribe to this topic via RSS or ATOM
Related Stories
  • Russian researchers at the Vostok station in Antarctica pose for a picture Feb. 5, 2012, after reaching subglacial lake Vostok, a major scientific discovery that could provide clues for search for life on other planets. Scientists hold a sign reading "05.02.12, Vostok station, boreshaft 5gr, lake at depth 3769.3 metres." (Associated Press/Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute Press Service)

    In scientific coup, Russians reach Antarctic lake

    After more than two decades of drilling in Antarctica, Russian scientists have reached a gigantic freshwater lake hidden under miles of ice for some 20 million years — a pristine body of water that may hold life from the distant past and clues to the search for life on other planets.

  • In scientific coup, Russians reach Antarctic lake

    Opening a scientific frontier miles under the Antarctic ice, Russian experts drilled down and finally reached the surface of a gigantic freshwater lake, an achievement the mission chief likened to placing a man on the moon.

  • This undated handout photo provided by the journal Science shows ice penetrating radar over the freeze-on ice along the southern margin of the Gamburtsev Mountains. The intense blue sky reflects the high altitude and thin atmosphere of the polar plateau. When it comes to ice, scientists are giving a whole new meaning to the phrase "bottoms up." Those massive ice sheets in Antarctica don't just grow from the bottom up, according to new research published Thursday. (AP Photo/Robin E. Bell--Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, New York)

    Bottoms up Antarctic ice growth discovered

    When it comes to ice, scientists are giving a whole new meaning to the phrase "bottoms up." Those massive ice sheets in Antarctica don't just grow on top when snow falls, they also grow from the bottom up, according to new research published Thursday.

More Stories →

Quotations
Happening Now