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  • Judge upholds $41 million ruling against Blixseth

    Real-estate developer Tim Blixseth was ordered to pay $41 million to creditors of the luxury Montana resort he helped drive into bankruptcy, by a federal judge who slammed the one-time billionaire for distorting the facts in the case.

  • FILE - In this file photo taken April 29, 2009, Tim Blixseth arrives at the federal courthouse in Missoula, Mont.   Attorneys for creditors from the 2008 bankruptcy of the exclusive Yellowstone Club want a federal judge to incarcerate the resort's founder for failing to heed court orders. The attorneys say Blixseth has engaged in a pattern of deceit through years of litigation in which he's sought to limit his liability in the club's financial collapse. That includes his alleged defiance of a Feb. 3 court order to pay at least $13.8 million for selling a Mexico resort that was part of the bankruptcy proceedings. Blixseth, a resident of Washington state, said Wednesday he hoped to resolve the matter but did not offer specifics.(AP Photo/Mike Alban, File)

    Attorneys ask for Blixseth's incarceration

    Attorneys for creditors in the bankruptcy of Montana's exclusive Yellowstone Club have asked a federal judge to incarcerate the resort's founder for failing to heed a court order after he was found to be in contempt.

  • Yellowstone Club co-founder ordered to pay $13.8M

    A federal judge has ordered Yellowstone Club founder Tim Blixseth to pay at least $13.8 million for violating a court order by selling an ocean resort in Mexico that was part of bankruptcy proceedings.

  • Ringleader of Bakken scheme sentenced to 30 years

    A judge sentenced a California man Thursday to 30 years in prison and ordered him to repay more than $5.1 million to victims duped into putting their money into nonexistent oil-and-gas projects in Montana and a gold mining scheme in Arizona.

  • AP Exclusive: 'Three Cups' author was overwhelmed

    "Three Cups of Tea" author Greg Mortenson says the dismissal of a civil lawsuit that accused him of fabricating book passages to make money for himself and his charity confirms his faith in the U.S. justice system.

  • APNewsBreak: 'Three Cups of Tea' lawsuit rejected

    A federal judge on Monday dismissed a civil lawsuit against author Greg Mortenson, calling claims "flimsy and speculative" that the humanitarian and his publisher lied in his best-selling "Three Cups of Tea" and "Stones Into Schools" books to boost sales.

  • APNewsBreak: 'Three Cups' author was 'overwhelmed'

    "Three Cups of Tea" author Greg Mortenson says he has been overwhelmed by all the issues facing him this past year, but that the dismissal of a civil lawsuit confirms his faith that the U.S. judicial system is fair.

  • **FILE** Greg Mortenson, founder of the Central Asia Institute, a Montana-based organization which builds schools for girls in remote tribal areas of Pakistan and Afghanistan (Associated Press/New Mark Communications via the St. Paul Paul Pioneer Press)

    Greg Mortenson: 'Three Cups' author lawsuit rejected

    A federal judge on Monday dismissed claims of fraud and racketeering against "Three Cups of Tea" author Greg Mortenson as "imprecise, flimsy and speculative."

  • APNewsBreak: 'Three Cups' author lawsuit rejected

    A federal judge on Monday dismissed a civil lawsuit against author Greg Mortenson, calling claims "flimsy and speculative" that the humanitarian and his publisher lied in his best-selling "Three Cups of Tea" and "Stones Into Schools" to boost book sales.

  • Author faces civil suit over 'Three Cups of Tea'

    Regardless of whether claims are true that author Greg Mortenson fabricated portions of "Three Cups of Tea," neither he nor his publisher can be held liable because the First Amendment protects exaggerations or lies in memoirs, his publisher's attorney said Wednesday.

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