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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. speaks to the media during a news conference following a Senate policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 2, 2015, as legislation to end the National Security Agency's collection of Americans' calling records while preserving other surveillance authorities is expected to clear the Senate late Tuesday. But House leaders have warned their Senate counterparts not to proceed with planned changes to a House version. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

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Sen. John McCain, R-Az., walks to the Senate Chamber to begin a special session to extend surveillance programs, in Washington, Sunday, May 31, 2015. The Senate was unable to make a deal to extend contested anti-terror provisions and as a result, the post-Sept. 11 programs expired at midnight Sunday. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

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Sen. John McCain, R-Az., walks to the Senate Chamber to begin a special session to extend surveillance programs, in Washington, Sunday, May 31, 2015. The Senate was unable to make a deal to extend contested anti-terror provisions and as a result, the post-Sept. 11 programs expired at midnight Sunday. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

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Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn. speaks with reporters as he walks to a luncheon with other Senate Republicans on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, May 22, 2015. Supporters of President Barack Obama's trade agenda hope to fend off hostile Senate amendments Friday and send a major trade bill to the House, where another fierce debate awaits. Senators also plan to address the government's soon-to-expire authority to collect bulk data on Americans' phone records. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

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FILE - In this May 5, 2015 file photo, Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell of Ky. walks to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington. Supporters of President Barack Obama’s trade agenda hope to fend off hostile Senate amendments Friday, May 22, 2015, and send a major trade bill to the House, where another fierce debate awaits. Legislation to renew the Patriot Act is also on the calendar, as is a bill to renew authority to commit federal funds for highway and bridge construction. McConnell is intent on keeping the anti-terrorism Patriot Act from lapsing while Republicans control the House and Senate. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

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In this image from Senate video, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., and a Republican presidential contender, speaks on the floor of the U.S. Senate Wednesday afternoon, May 20, 2015, at the Capitol in Washington, during a long speech opposing renewal of the Patriot Act. Paul claimed he was filibustering, but under the Senate rules, he wasn’t. (Senate TV via AP)

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The new agreement paves the way for passage of the deal through the Senate, but President Obama's own troops in the House said their opposition is intensifying, and they blamed the president for mishandling the politics of his top second-term priority. (Associated Press)

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FILE - In this Feb. 24, 2015 file photo, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. is seen on Capitol Hill in Washington. Senate leaders said Tuesday that Democrats have enough votes to block action on President Barack Obama's trade initiatives unless the parties can work out disagreements on how to package various bills. Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio, a strong opponent of Obama’s trade agenda, said Democrats have more than enough votes to block action for now. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Kentucky Republican, agreed. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

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In this photo taken April 23, 2015, Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash. poses for a portrait following an interview with The Associated Press in her office on Capitol Hill. There’s a disturbance in the force of the tradition-bound Senate and her name is Patty Murray. The Washington state Democrat, once famously dubbed “just a mom in tennis shoes,” is the reason behind an uncomfortable power standoff between two men who intend to lead the Democrats after Minority Leader Harry Reid retires. Murray, her quiet style and her clout amassed over 22 years in the Senate, poses a challenge to the way things work in Washington. She’s poised to be the first woman in the Senate’s top-tier leadership. And she’s outgrown her image as the ultimate underdog, if not the mom in storied footwear.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., center, and Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., right, head into the Senate Chamber on Cap[itol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 23, 2015, for the confirmation vote on the nomination of Loretta Lynch for Attorney General. Lynch won confirmation to serve as attorney general Thursday from a Senate that forced her to wait more than five months for the title and remained divided to the end. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. walks from his office to the Senate floor on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 23, 2015, as the Senate is expected to vote on the nomination of Loretta Lynch as the next attorney general. The vote to confirm Ms. Lynch, who would be the first female African American Attorney General, has been delayed for over five months. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

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In this file photo taken Feb. 5, 2015, Arkansas State Sen. Bart Hester, R-Cave Springs, presents a bill to the a Senate at the Arkansas state Capitol in Little Rock, Ark., to prevent local governments from passing their own anti-discrimination laws. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston, File)

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Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada pauses during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 14, 2015, following a Senate policy luncheon. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

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"It would provide tools to finally repeal and replace Obamacare itself, leaving the law's higher costs and broken promises where they belong — in the past — in favor of a fresh start, and the opportunity for real health reform," said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Kentucky Republican who said just having the debate was a major change for a Senate that had been calcified in recent years. (associated press)

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Maryland House Speaker Michael Busch, Anne Arundel Democrat, said his chamber was "open" to dealing with the Senate bill nixing the rain-tax mandate. (Associated Press)

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The spending fights will make it tough for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and House Speaker John A. Boehner to cobble a coalition able to pass a budget, and they are unlikely to get any help from Democrats, who have slammed the twin GOP proposals released this week — one for the House and one for the Senate — as "warmed-over stew." (Associated Press)

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Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., left, and Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., participate in a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, March 6, 2014, following a Senate vote on military sexual assaults. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) **FILE**

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FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2015 file photo, Attorney General nominee Loretta Lynch testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says the Senate will begin consideration of Lynch's nomination to be attorney general next week. Democrats have been pressing for the Senate to act on President Barack Obama's selection of Lynch, who is the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of New York. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

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At a Senate hearing Tuesday, Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey asked Congress to end sequestration and boost defense spending by $38 billion next year. (Associated Press)

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Oklahoma Sen. Jim Inhofe reportedly tossed a snowball Thursday on the Senate floor while arguing against "the hysteria on global warming." (C-SPAN2 via National Journal)