Sergei Magnitsky

Latest Sergei Magnitsky Items
  • Nataliya Magnitskaya, mother of Russian lawyer Sergei Magnitsky, who died in jail, holds his portrait during an interview with the AP in Moscow in 2009. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

    MCKINNEY: Magnitsky Act triggers Russian retort

    In 2008, Sergei Magnitsky, a young Russian lawyer, uncovered $230 billion in tax fraud. In a parody of justice, the Russian government arrested him for tax fraud. In November 2009, after being abused and neglected, Magnitsky died in prison.


  • Rep. James McGovern condemns Russian trial of dead lawyer

    A decision by Russian authorities to go ahead with the trial of a dead lawyer is yet another example of the "endless vendetta" against him, a U.S. congressman said Monday.


  • Nataliya Magnitskaya, mother of Russian lawyer Sergei Magnitsky, who died in jail, holds his portrait during an interview with the AP in Moscow in 2009. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

    Retaliation, Russian style: 60 Americans denied visas

    Russia has compiled a list of U.S. officials with ties to Guantanamo Bay and denied their entry visas — all in retaliation for U.S. sanctions against Russian officials with alleged ties to the suspicious death of an attorney who battled corruption and abuse, Sergei Magnitsky.


  • The Washington Times

    BERMAN: U.S.-Russia 'reset' hasn't changed stance

    You might not be familiar with Sergei Magnitsky, the 37-year-old Russian lawyer who died of medical complications while languishing in a Moscow prison back in 2009.


  • Illustration: Kremlin corruption by John Camejo for The Washington Times

    FEULNER: A malfunctioning 'reset'

    It has been two years now since President Obama heralded a new era in U.S.-Russian relations - a "reset," as he put it. His plan was to "cooperate more effectively in areas of common interest." He and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev were "committed to leaving behind the suspicion and the rivalry of the past."


  • ** FILE ** Russian President Dmitry Medvedev (Associated Press/Presidential Press Service)

    Tit for tat: Moscow lists U.S. officials to be barred

    Moscow is preparing a list of U.S. officials it will ban from Russia in retaliation for a White House policy to keep Russian human rights abusers out of the U.S.


  • Dmitry Rogozin, Russia's ambassador to NATO, speaks during a news conference at NATO headquarters in Brussels. The blunt-spoken ambassador, laid out Russia's position: While the U.S. still has nuclear weapons abroad, "We have already withdrawn all the tactical nuclear weapons of Russia back home," from the territories of former East European allies and ex-Soviet republics. (Associated Press)

    COHEN: Russian 'reset' malfunction

    The recent Russian threats to cease crucial cooperation with the United States and statements by Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin and Dmitry Rogozin, Russia's special representative for missile defense cooperation with NATO, raised hackles in Washington. Mr. Putin called the United States a "parasite" on the body of the global economy, while Mr. Rogozin claimed that U.S. senators told him U.S. missile defense is aimed at his country.


  • Boris Nemtsov

    Embassy Row

    An attack on a Russian opposition leader who testified before Congress last week has refocused attention on a bill to impose a U.S. travel ban on dozens of Russian officials suspected of complicity in the death of a Russian human rights lawyer in a Moscow prison last year.


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