Shinya Yamanaka

Latest Shinya Yamanaka Items
  • Gurdon

    Two share Nobel Prize in medicine for cell discovery

    Two scientists from different generations won the Nobel Prize in medicine Monday for the groundbreaking discovery that cells in the body can be reprogrammed to become completely different kinds, potentially opening the door to growing customized tissues for treatments.


  • ** FILE ** Japanese scientist Shinya Yamanaka (left) and British researcher John Gurdon, winners of the 2012 Nobel Prize in medicine, speak to each other at a symposium in Tokyo in April 2008. (AP Photo/Kyodo News)

    British, Japanese researchers win Nobel in medicine

    Researchers John Gurdon of Great Britain and Shinya Yamanaka of Japan have won this year's Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine on Monday for discovering that mature, specialized cells of the body can be reprogrammed into stem cells — a discovery that scientists hope to turn into new treatments.


  • British, Japanese share Nobel Prize for medicine

    WHO WON?


  • Nobel awarded for stem cell, early cloning work

    Two scientists from different generations won the Nobel Prize in medicine Monday for the groundbreaking discovery that cells in the body can be reprogrammed into completely different kinds, work that reflects the mechanism behind cloning and offers an alternative to using embryonic stem cells.


  • Gurdon, Yamanaka win Nobel medicine prize

    British researcher John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka of Japan won this year's Nobel Prize in medicine on Monday for discovering that mature, specialized cells of the body can be reprogrammed into stem cells _ a discovery that scientists hope to turn into new treatments.


  • Nobel prize to Briton, Japanese for stem cell work

    Two scientists from different generations won the Nobel Prize in medicine Monday for the groundbreaking discovery that cells in the body can be reprogrammed to become completely different kinds, potentially opening the door to growing customized tissues for treatments.


  • Obesity or stem cell research could win Nobel

    Two scientists who unlocked some of the mysteries linked to obesity or a professor who figured out how to make stem cells without human embryos could be candidates for the medicine award when the first of the 2011 Nobel Prizes are announced Monday.


  • In this July 12, 2008 photo British physiologist Robert Edwards, left, attends the 30th anniversary of the world's first "test tube" fertilization baby Louise Joy Brown, right, holding her son Cameron. At centre left is her mother, Lesley Brown, at the Bourn Hall, in Bourn, England. A British scientist who developed test tube fertilization and gave thousands of infertile couples the chance to have children, has received the 2010 Nobel Prize in medicine, it was announced on Monday, Oct. 4, 2010. Starting in the 1950's, Robert Edwards and Patrick Steptoe developed the so-called IVF technology where egg cells are fertilized by sperm outside the body. Steptoe died in 1988. (AP Photo/Chris Radburn, PA)

    Stem cell pioneer mentioned for Nobel Prize

    A Japanese researcher who discovered how to make stem cells from ordinary skin cells and avoid the ethical quandaries of making them from human eggs could be a candidate for the medicine award when the 2010 Nobel Prize announcements kick off Monday, experts said.


  • Stem cell pioneer in the buzz for Nobel Prize

    Experts say a Japanese researcher who discovered how to make stem cells from ordinary skin cells and so avoid the ethical quandaries of making them from human eggs could be a candidate for the medicine award when the 2010 Nobel Prize announcements start Monday.


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