Topic - Shinzō Abe

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  • A bronze statue of a young Korean girl in Central Park in Glendale, Calif. to honor so-called "comfort women" from World War II on Monday, March 31, 2014. Korean-Americans have won approval for local memorials for the victims of Japanese sexual slavery during World War II, over the objections of Japan. They have also pressed states to change school textbooks to address geographical differences with Japan.  (AP Photo/Nick Ut )

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  • Japanese Parliamentary Senior Vice-Minister of Defense Ryota Takeda, top, and new workers bow during a welcome ceremony at Defense Ministry in Tokyo, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Japan relaxed a decades-old ban on military-related exports Tuesday in a bid to expand joint arms development with allies and equipment sales to Southeast Asia and elsewhere. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

    Japan OKs easing of military-related exports

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  • President Barack Obama, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, right, and South Korean President Park Geun-hye, participate in a trilateral meeting at the US Ambassador's Residence in the Hague, Netherlands, Tuesday, March 25, 2014. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

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  • People observe a moment of silence in front of what is left of a disaster control center in an area devastated by the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami, in Minamisanriku, Miyagi prefecture, Tuesday, March 11, 2014.  Japan is marking the third anniversary of the devastating earthquake and tsunami that left nearly 19,000 people dead or missing, turned coastal communities into wasteland and triggered a nuclear crisis.  (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)

    Japan marks 3rd anniversary of tsunami disasters

    Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pledged to boost rebuilding efforts as the country marked the third anniversary Tuesday of a devastating earthquake and tsunami that left nearly 19,000 people dead, destroyed coastal communities and triggered a nuclear crisis.

  • Conservatives push agenda at Japan's public TV

    Minutes of a recent governing board meeting of Japan's public broadcaster NHK seem to back up suspicions that Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, despite his denials, is trying to use Japan's news giant to promote his nationalist agenda.

  • Panel: Japan should lift ban on collective defense

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  • Inside China: Beijing prefers the world to think WWII not WWI in terms of rising tensions

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  • In this photo taken on Saturday, Jan. 25, 2014, Katsuto Momii, new president of public broadcaster NHK, holds a news conference at the start of his three-year term in Tokyo. Japan's top government spokesman Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga defended Momii for his remarks that the use of women as military prostitutes was common worldwide during World War II. NHK chairman Momii told a news conference Saturday to mark his appointment that "comfort women" existed in any country at war, not just Japan. (AP Photo/Kyodo News) JAPAN OUT, MANDATORY CREDIT

    Japan NHK boss under fire for comfort women remark

    Japan's top government spokesman on Monday defended the new head of public broadcaster NHK for his remarks that the use of women as military prostitutes was common worldwide during World War II.

  • Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, center, follows a Shinto priest to pay respect for the war dead at Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo Thursday, Dec. 26, 2013. Abe visited Yasukuni war shrine in a move sure to infuriate China and South Korea. The visit to the shrine, which honors 2.5 million war dead including convicted class A war criminals, appears to be a departure from Abe’s “pragmatic” approach to foreign policy, in which he tried to avoid alienating neighboring countries. It was the first visit by a sitting prime minister since Junichiro Koizumi went to mark the end of World War II in 2006. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)

    Japanese prime minister visits Yasukuni war shrine, irks China

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  • U.S. Vice President Joe Biden shakes hands with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the end of a joint press conference following their meeting at Abe's official residence in Tokyo Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2013. Biden voiced strong opposition Tuesday to China's new air defense zone above a set of disputed islands, showing a united front with an anxious Japan as tension in the region simmered. Standing side by side in Tokyo with Abe, Biden said the U.S. is "deeply concerned" about China's attempt to unilaterally change the status quo in the East China Sea. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)

    Joe Biden: China air zone raises risk of accidents

    U.S. Vice President Joe Biden voiced strong opposition Tuesday to China's new air defense zone above a set of disputed islands, showing a united front with an anxious Japan as tension in the region simmered.

  • Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (second from right, with a red helmet) is briefed about a chemical dam by Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant chief Akira Ono (second from left) as the lawmaker inspects an area along the coast between the No. 1 and No. 2 reactors during his tour of the tsunami-crippled plant in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013. (AP Photo/Japan Pool)

    Japanese leader Shinzo Abe wants Fukushima nuke plant completely scrapped

    Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe ordered the operator of the country's crippled nuclear power plant Thursday to scrap all six reactors at the site instead of just four already slated for decommissioning and to concentrate on tackling pressing issues such as radioactive water leaks.

  • Russian President Vladimir Putin shakes hands with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe during a meeting in Moscow on Monday. It was the first Russian visit by a Japanese prime minister in 10 years. (Associated Press)

    Inside China: Chagrined by Shinzo Abe's Russia visit

    Japan is using "value diplomacy" to create the geopolitical encirclement of China, according to China's state-run media. That point was emphasized across the communist nation's media spectrum as Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe began a historic seven-day visit to Russia, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Turkey.

  • Park Geun-hye (center), South Korea's new president, arrives for the official dinner at the presidential Blue House in Seoul on Monday, Feb. 25, 2013. Miss Park took office as the country's first female president earlier in the day. (AP Photo/Kim Jae-hwan, Pool)

    Disputes in Asia pose challenge to Obama

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  • Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe arrives Thursday at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland for a meeting Friday with President Obama in the Oval Office. Cybersecurity will be among the topics on the two leaders' agenda. (Associated Press)

    Timing good for Japanese prime minister’s visit

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  • The Washington Times

    FEULNER: Conservative tide in Asia

    There are no permanent victories in democratic politics and no permanent defeats. Thus, even as conservatives in the United States are working to find better ways to present our ideas in the 2014 and 2016 elections, we should pause a moment to celebrate some successes overseas.

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Quotations
  • "What we can say after seeing what happened to Ukraine is that using force to change the status quo is not acceptable," said Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, whose country is in one of the fiercest disputes with China.

    Asia seeks Obama's assurance in territorial spats →

  • U.S. Ambassador to Japan Caroline Kennedy, left, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe communicate with Japanese astronaut and International Space Station (ISS) commander Koichi Wakata, seen at center on the screen in background, at the latter's official residence in Tokyo, Thursday, April 10, 2014.

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