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  • FILE - In this April 28, 2014 file photo, General Electric Co. CEO Jeffrey R. Immelt leaves the Elysee Palace after meeting with French President Francois Hollande in Paris. General Electric inched closer to buying the energy-related businesses of France's Alstom by making a $16.9 billion bid, but rival offers and political concern in France may hold up or scuttle the deal. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)

    GE buy of Alstom energy business not a done deal

    General Electric inched closer to buying the energy-related businesses of France's Alstom by making a $16.9 billion bid, but rival offers and the concerns of French politicians may hold up or scuttle the deal.


  • U.S. giant General Electric Co. CEO Jeffrey R. Immelt leaves the Elysee Palace after meeting with French President Francois Hollande in Paris, Monday, April 28, 2014.  Hollande met Sunday with top members of the government to discuss Alstom, hours after the Economy Minister Arnaud Montebourg warned the engineering company not to pursue a "precipitous" tie-up with U.S. giant General Electric Co., saying that France's national interest is at stake in a potential sale. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)

    Orchestrating Alstom follows long French tradition

    France's Socialist leader summoned three CEOs to the presidential palace on Monday to orchestrate the sale of Alstom, an engineering firm and treasure of French industry, in the government's latest effort to bring globalization to heel.


  • Ex-Texas coach accused of improper photography

    An assistant high school coach and substitute teacher has been fired from his job and arrested after he was accused by students with taking video images under their skirts.


  • Siemens' large order of turbines helps Hutchinson

    The Siemens Wind company said it likely will add 30 new jobs at its Hutchinson plant to accommodate an order for 64 of its 3.0-megawatt direct-drive turbines for a wind farm in North Dakota.


  • ** FILE ** This photo April 17, 2012, file photo shows Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson during an interview with The Associated Press at EPA Headquarters in Washington. Jackson, The Obama administration's chief environmental watchdog, is stepping down after a nearly four-year tenure marked by high-profile brawls over global warming pollution, the Keystone XL oil pipeline, new controls on coal-fired plants and several other hot-button issues that affect the nation's economy and people's health. (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf, File)

    Ex-EPA administrator Lisa Jackson contacted lobbyist from private email

    Former Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson used her private email to conduct official business, including with a lobbyist, in a possible violation of federal record laws.


  • ** FILE ** Dark clouds hang above the Siemens headquarters in Munich in December 2006. (AP Photo/Diether Endlicher, File)

    U.S. indicts ex-Siemens execs on bribery charges

    Eight former executives and agents of Siemens AG and its subsidiaries have been charged in a decade-long scheme to bribe senior government officials in Argentina to secure, implement and enforce a $1 billion contract with the Argentine government to produce national identity cards, the Justice Department said Tuesday.


  • The Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant on the banks of the Connecticut River in Vernon, Vt. (Associated Press file)

    Mediocre hackers can cause major damage

    The computer systems that control vital industrial machinery in nuclear power plants, water treatment facilities and many other factories are vulnerable to deadly sabotage by hackers with even moderate skills, security researchers say.


  • The seal of the Department of Homeland Security

    Homemade cyberweapon worries federal officials

    Two security researchers, working at home in their spare time, have created a cyberweapon similar to the sophisticated Stuxnet computer worm that was discovered last year to have disrupted computer systems running Iran's nuclear program.


  • Britain releases German spy files

    She was thought to be one of Germany's prized secret agents, described as beautiful and languid, and capable of infiltrating an enemy camp, obtaining secret plans of attack, and then delivering them to her bosses.


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