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  • Study: NJ beaches 30-40 feet narrower after storm

    The average New Jersey beach is 30 to 40 feet narrower after Superstorm Sandy, according to a survey that is sure to intensify a long-running debate on whether federal dollars should be used to replenish stretches of sand that only a fraction of U.S. taxpayers use.

  • Waves bash against a sewage outfall structure in Point Pleasant Beach N.J. on Nov. 15, 2012. Before Superstorm Sandy caused massive beach erosion at the Jersey shore, the outfall had about 50 feet of beach between it and the ocean. Superstorm Sandy took a bite out of the Jersey shore, washing away millions of tons of sand and slimming down beaches along the state's 127-mile coastline. (Associated Press)

    Study: N.J. beaches 30-40 feet narrower after storm

    The average New Jersey beach is 30 to 40 feet narrower after Superstorm Sandy, according to a survey that is sure to intensify a long-running debate on whether federal dollars should be used to replenish stretches of sand that only a fraction of U.S. taxpayers use.

  • Superstorm shines light on federal beach program

    Towns along the Jersey shore that made use of federal money to build up beaches came through Superstorm Sandy with far less damage than those that didn't, findings that are sure to intensify a debate that has raged for years over the wisdom of pumping millions of dollars' worth of sand onto the coastline, only to see it wash away continually.

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