Supreme Court

Latest Supreme Court Items
  • **FILE** Sen. Orrin Hatch (Associated Press)

    Hatch cites Obama assurance not to appoint 'radical' justice

    Sen. Orrin G. Hatch on Monday said President Obama promised him he would not nominate a radical liberal to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter.


  • associated press
 President Obama confirms in a surprise visit to the White House press briefing room Friday that Justice David. H. Souter plans to retire from the Supreme Court this year. Conservative activists have vowed to oppose any nominee they see as liberal.

    Obama wants court pick to have 'empathy'

    President Obama said Friday he will look beyond traditional legal experience to fill the seat of retiring Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter — to someone who can relate to average Americans.


  • Getty Images

    GOP's McCain-Feingold suit looks to Supreme Court

    Election lawyers say the Republican National Committee is probably banking on changes to the Supreme Court in its latest challenge to the McCain-Feingold campaign finance law.


  • Inside Politics

    "In the guise of interpreting the California constitution, the state's Supreme Court on May 15 made certain that the issue of same-sex marriage will be a national one in the 2008 presidential race," writes in the Weekly Standard.


  • Judges stance bolsters McCain

    federal judgeships.


  • A marriage of convenience

    The Supreme Court of California's unilateral redefinition of marriage last week showed so much contempt for the doctrine of separation of powers that even many supporters of gay marriage who once spoke favorably of Massachusetts' similar 2003 ruling are uncomfortable with California's. The editorialists at The Washington Post, for instance, who consider gay marriage "a matter of social and political justice," lambaste the court for "an unnecessary bout of judicial micromanagement by redefining marriage through a novel reading of the state constitution." They worry that the "flawed court decision could trigger serious political backlash because the outcome was produced not by the state's voters but by a 4 to 3 majority of judges."


  • As colleges go, so go our courts

    California's Supreme Court has made its contribution to the ongoing debasement of our law, our language, and our culture by legalizing same-sex marriage.


  • A marriage of convenience

    The Supreme Court of California's unilateral redefinition of marriage last week showed so much contempt for the doctrine of separation of powers that even many supporters of gay marriage who once spoke favorably of Massachusetts' similar 2003 ruling are uncomfortable with California's. The editorialists at The Washington Post, for instance, who consider gay marriage "a matter of social and political justice," lambaste the court for "an unnecessary bout of judicial micromanagement by redefining marriage through a novel reading of the state constitution." They worry that the "flawed court decision could trigger serious political backlash because the outcome was produced not by the state's voters but by a 4 to 3 majority of judges."


  • High-court fears drive conservatives to rally around McCain, overlook flaws

    Prominent conservatives and activists are indicating they will put aside their differences with presumptive Republican presidential nominee Sen. John McCain and rally their supporters to his side because of one issue: federal judgeships.


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