Susan Illston

Latest Susan Illston Items
  • Feds mulling next move in Bonds saga

    After years of investigation, three weeks of trial and millions of dollars spent pursuing Barry Bonds, federal prosecutors were back where they started Thursday _ deciding whether to try and prove the home run king's records were built with steroids and lies.


  • In an image provided by the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, the first page of the jury's verdict form shows that jurors were unable to reach a verdict on three of the charges against Barry Bonds in his perjury trial, Wednesday, April 13, 2011, in San Francisco. Bonds was convicted of a single charge of obstruction of justice. (AP Photo/U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California)

    Bonds guilty of obstruction of justice

    Barry Bonds stepped outside the Phillip Burton Federal Building for the first time as a convicted felon, and a school bus went by. The home-run king flashed a victory sign with two fingers.


  • **FILE** Former baseball player Barry Bonds arrives April 5, 2011, for his trial at federal court in San Francisco. (Associated Press)

    Barry Bonds found guilty of obstruction of justice

    A federal jury convicted Barry Bonds of a single charge of obstruction of justice Wednesday but failed to reach a verdict on the three counts at the heart of allegations that he knowingly used steroids and human growth hormone and lied to a grand jury about it.


  • San Francisco Giants fan Thomas Peterson holds a baseball that Barry Bonds signed as he left federal court Wednesday, April 13, 2011, in San Francisco. A federal jury convicted Bonds of a single charge of obstruction of justice Wednesday but failed to reach a verdict on the three counts at the heart of allegations that he knowingly used steroids and human growth hormone and lied to a grand jury about it. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

    Bonds guilty of obstruction of justice

    Just like the whole Steroid Era: We'll never really know.


  • San Francisco Giants fan Thomas Peterson holds a baseball that Barry Bonds signed as he left federal court Wednesday, April 13, 2011, in San Francisco. A federal jury convicted Bonds of a single charge of obstruction of justice Wednesday but failed to reach a verdict on the three counts at the heart of allegations that he knowingly used steroids and human growth hormone and lied to a grand jury about it. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

    Bonds jury deliberates for 3rd day with no verdict

    Jurors in the Barry Bonds case remained mostly out of sight on day 3 of their deliberations. They never entered Judge Susan Illston's courtroom on the 19th floor of the Phillip Burton Federal Building, spending about six hours behind closed doors Tuesday without reaching a verdict.


  • San Francisco Giants fan Thomas Peterson holds a baseball that Barry Bonds signed as he left federal court Wednesday, April 13, 2011, in San Francisco. A federal jury convicted Bonds of a single charge of obstruction of justice Wednesday but failed to reach a verdict on the three counts at the heart of allegations that he knowingly used steroids and human growth hormone and lied to a grand jury about it. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

    Bonds jury begins deliberations

    As jurors deliberated the government's case against Barry Bonds on Friday, a judge ordered the release from prison of the slugger's trainer and defense attorneys accused a prosecutor of giving a misleading closing argument.


  • Barry Bonds

    Bonds case with jury after angry closing arguments

    The eight women and four men sat in the jury box for more than 4 1/2 hours Thursday, listening to angry arguments from federal prosecutors and Barry Bonds' attorneys at the end of a 12-day trial that exposed the dark world of baseball's steroids era.


  • San Francisco Giants fan Thomas Peterson holds a baseball that Barry Bonds signed as he left federal court Wednesday, April 13, 2011, in San Francisco. A federal jury convicted Bonds of a single charge of obstruction of justice Wednesday but failed to reach a verdict on the three counts at the heart of allegations that he knowingly used steroids and human growth hormone and lied to a grand jury about it. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

    Bonds' jurors hear Anderson-Hoskins recording over

    The jurors who will decide Barry Bonds' fate filed back into the courtroom with their first question Friday, and it was one that had to make prosecutors happy.


  • FILE - This May 8, 2003, file photo shows San Francico Giants' Barry Bonds reacting after flying out during the first inning against the Florida Marlins, at Pro Player Stadium in Miami.  More than three years after Bonds was first indicted, his federal trial is finally nearing its end. The record-setting baseball star is charged with three counts of lying to a grand jury in December 2003.  (AP Photo/Steve Mitchell, File)

    Before deliberating, Bonds' jurors get an earful

    The eight women and four men sat in the jury box for more than 4 1/2 hours, listening to angry arguments from federal prosecutors and Barry Bonds' attorneys at the end of a 12-day trial that exposed the dark world of baseball's Steroids Era.


Happening Now