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New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez waves to her supporters upon her arrival to the victory party on election night in Albuquerque, N.M., Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014. Republican Susana Martinez was re-elected beating Democratic challenger Gary King. (AP Photo/Andres Leighton)

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If the GOP is to make greater inroads with Hispanic and female voters, New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez, a former Democrat, is well-positioned to lead the charge. (Associated Press)

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If the GOP is to make greater inroads with Hispanic and female voters, New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez, a former Democrat, is well-positioned to lead the charge. (Associated Press)

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Jamie Estrada, 41, of Los Lunas, N.M., leaves Federal Court in Albuquerque, N.M., Monday June 16, 2014, after pleading guilty to the unlawful interception of electronic communications and false statements charges arising out of the unlawful interception of emails intended for others, including New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez and members of her staff. (AP Photo/The Albuquerque Journal, Greg Sorber)

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In this May 3, 2014 photo, Carl Newton attends a Democratic gubernatorial candidate forum in Albuquerque, N.M. New Mexico Democrats like Newton are hoping to oust Republican Gov. Susana Martinez in this year’s election. (AP Photo/Barry Massey)

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Gov. Susana Martinez talks to reporters about a series of initiatives aimed at improving New Mexico's child welfare system during a news conference in Albuquerque, N.M. on Wednesday, April 2, 2014. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)

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Gov. Susana Martinez talks to reporters about a series of initiatives aimed at improving New Mexico's child welfare system during a news conference in Albuquerque, N.M. on Wednesday, April 2, 2014. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)

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CORRECTS DAY OF WEEK TO WEDNESDAY, NOT MONDAY - Gov. Susana Martinez, left, and Children, Youth and Families Secretary Yolanda Deines answer questions about a series of initiatives aimed at improving New Mexico's child welfare system during a news conference in Albuquerque, N.M. on Tuesday, April 2, 2014. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)

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New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez, center, signs the Capital Outlay Bill, a spending measure that includes $89 million for critical infrastructure aimed at securing drinking water resources for communities around New Mexico, as Sen. Pete Campos (D-New Mexico), sitting right, looks on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, at Plaza Park in Las Vegas, N.M. Also looking on are various state and local officials. (AP Photo/Las Vegas Optic, Mercy López)

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New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez, left, signs the Capital Outlay Bill, a spending measure that includes $89 million for critical infrastructure aimed at securing drinking water resources for communities around New Mexico, as Sen. Pete Campos (D-New Mexico) looks on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, at Plaza Park in Las Vegas, N.M. Also looking on are various state and local officials. (AP Photo/Las Vegas Optic, Mercy López)

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New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez speaks to reporters at Puesta del Sol elementary school in Rio Rancho, N.M., before signing a $6 billion state budget on Tuesday, March 11, 2014. Gov. Martinez state budget eliminated pay raises for judges, district attorneys and appointed government workers. Martinez cut spending about $27 million with line-item vetoes, including $2.4 million that lawmakers had provided for 8 percent salary increases for judges and district attorneys and about 3 percent raises for workers in appointed government positions. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras)

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New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez signs the state's $6 billion budget Tuesday next to students at Puesta del Sol elementary in Rio Rancho, N.M., on Tuesday, March, 11, 2014. Gov. Martinez state budget eliminated pay raises for judges, district attorneys and appointed government workers. Martinez cut spending about $27 million with line-item vetoes, including $2.4 million that lawmakers had provided for 8 percent salary increases for judges and district attorneys and about 3 percent raises for workers in appointed government positions. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras)

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New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez signs the state's $6 billion budget surrounded by students at Puesta del Sol elementary school in Rio Rancho, N.M., on Tuesday March 11, 2014. Gov. Martinez state budget eliminated pay raises for judges, district attorneys and appointed government workers. Martinez cut spending about $27 million with line-item vetoes, including $2.4 million that lawmakers had provided for 8 percent salary increases for judges and district attorneys and about 3 percent raises for workers in appointed government positions. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras)

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From left, Navajo Nations delegate, LoRenzo Bates, speaks with Navajo Nations President, Ben Shelly, during a joint committee on Gaming Compacts at the State Capitol on Friday, Jan. 31, 2014 in Santa Fe, N.M. A legislative panel asked the Navajo Nation and Gov. Susana Martinez's administration on Friday to renegotiate a proposed compact to restrict the state's largest tribe to their existing casinos rather than allowing an expansion of gambling. (AP Photo/The Santa Fe New Mexican, Jane Phillips)