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Tappan Zee Bridge

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Biologist Chris Burnett throws a sturgeon back into the Hudson River north of the Tappan Zee bridge in Tarrytown, N.Y. Wednesday, May 28, 2014, after surgically implanting an electronic transmitter in the fish's belly. Scientists hope the tracking devices will allow them to track and study the federally endangered species to detect behavioral or adverse affects during construction of the new Tappan Zee bridge. While the sturgeon's life and reproductive cycle is complex, the fish spawns in the Hudson River in April and May. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

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Biologist Chris Burnett places a shortnosed sturgeon on a board containing a ruler for measuring before implanting an electronic an electronic tracking device in the fish's belly near the Tappan Zee Bridge north of Tarrytown, N.Y., Wednesday, May 28, 2014. The tagging is part of The shortnose sturgeon and its much larger cousin, the Atlantic sturgeon, are on the federal endangered species list. Both types of sturgeon will be tracked and studied as the state of New York complies with safety measures that were conditions of the New York Thruway Authority's permit to build the new Tappan Zee bridge, scheduled for completion in 2018. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

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President Barack Obama speaks in Tarrytown, N.Y., near the Tappan Zee Bridge, seen in the background, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, about the need for a 21st Century Transportation Infrastructure. (AP Photo)