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Fromer Navy SEAL Christopher Mark Heben recovers in a hospital after being shot in the stomach by assailants in Ohio. (Image: Facebook)

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Former Navy SEAL Christopher Mark Heben recovers in a hospital after allegedly being shot in the stomach by assailants in Ohio. (Facebook)

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** FILE ** In this Thursday, March 20, 2013, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Zuckerberg reaped a $3.3 billion gain last year by exercising stock options in the social networking company that he founded in a Harvard University dorm room. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)

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RIKEN research institute president Ryoji Noyori, left, is helped to adjust a microphone by Executive Director Minoru Yonekura during a press conference in Tokyo, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Scientists at the RIKEN, a Japanese government-funded laboratory, said Tuesday it found that data in a widely heralded stem-cell research paper was falsified, holding the lead researcher responsible for the fabrication. The research results from the Riken Center for Development Biology in Kobe, western Japan, were seen as a possible groundbreaking method for growing tissue to treat illnesses such as diabetes and Parkinson's disease using a simple lab procedure. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

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RIKEN research institute President Ryoji Noyori answers a reporter's questions during a press conference in Tokyo, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Scientists at the RIKEN, a Japanese government-funded laboratory, said Tuesday it found that data in a widely heralded stem-cell research paper was falsified, holding the lead researcher responsible for the fabrication. The research results from the Riken Center for Development Biology in Kobe, western Japan, were seen as a possible groundbreaking method for growing tissue to treat illnesses such as diabetes and Parkinson's disease using a simple lab procedure. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

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RIKEN research institute President Ryoji Noyori speaks during a press conference in Tokyo, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Scientists at the RIKEN, a Japanese government-funded laboratory, said Tuesday it found that data in a widely heralded stem-cell research paper was falsified, holding the lead researcher responsible for the fabrication. The research results from the Riken Center for Development Biology in Kobe, western Japan, were seen as a possible groundbreaking method for growing tissue to treat illnesses such as diabetes and Parkinson's disease using a simple lab procedure. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

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This Jan. 28, 2014 photo shows Haruko Obokata, a researcher of Japanese government-funded laboratory Riken Center for Development Biology in Kobe, western Japan. Scientists at the institute said Tuesday, April 1, that discrepancies in research published in January in scientific journal Nature stemmed from image manipulation and data fabrication. They said Obokata, the lead author of a widely heralded stem-cell research paper, had manipulated or falsified images of DNA fragments used in the research. (AP Photo/Kyodo News) JAPAN OUT, MANDATORY CREDIT

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In this Jan. 28, 2014 photo, Japanese government-funded laboratory Riken Center for Development Biology researcher Haruko Obokata, the lead author of a widely heralded stem-cell research paper, speaks about her research results on stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency (STAP) cells during a press conference in Kobe, western Japan. Scientists at the institute said Tuesday, April 1, that discrepancies in research published in January in scientific journal Nature stemmed from image manipulation and data fabrication. They said Obokata had manipulated or falsified images of DNA fragments used in the research. (AP Photo/Kyodo News) JAPAN OUT, MANDATORY CREDIT