Topic - Texaco

Texaco ("The Texas Company") is the name of an American oil retail brand. Its flagship product is its fuel, "Texaco with Techron". It also owns the Havoline motor oil brand. - Source: Wikipedia

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  • The trial in New York of lawyer Steven Donziger, who brought natives of the Ecuadorean Amazon to court with him in 1999, reaches a climax this week as he defends himself against charges that he engineered a record-breaking $19 billion judgment against Chevron Corp. for contamination of the Amazon rain forest. Ecuador had originally opposed the class-action suit, filed in 1993 on behalf of indigenous Indians and others. (Associated Press)

    D.C. firm retreats in Chevron legal battle

    In a stunning retreat, high-powered Washington, D.C. firm Patton Boggs agreed Wednesday to pay $15 million to energy giant Chevron and withdraw from its central role in trying to enforce an Ecuadorean court judgment against the oil company that was found to have been obtained through fraud.

  • Lawyer Steven Donziger, right, speaks to  Huaorani women during this first day of the trial against Chevron-Texaco, in Lago Agrio, Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2003. A decade after Texaco pulled out of the Amazon jungle, the U.S. petroleum giant went on trial Tuesday in a lawsuit filed on behalf of 30,000 poor Ecuadoreans who say the company's 20 years of drilling poisoned their homeland.  (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)

    Environmental firm Stratus cited in Chevron fraud case got federal contracts

    The environmental consulting firm accused by a judge of assisting "egregious fraud" by plaintiffs in the highly publicized lawsuit against Chevron Corp. successively received multimillion-dollar contracts from the U.S. government, including work on the infamous BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

  • FILE - In this photo taken Friday, Feb. 4, 2011 file photo US actor Danny Glover gestures as he arrives at Rome's main train station. The lawyer of Haiti's Jean-Bertrand Aristide says actor Danny Glover has arrived in South Africa to escort the exiled former president home. Miami lawyer Ira Kurzban flew to Johannesburg Wednesday on the same mission amid unexplained delays as the United States called for Aristide to put off his departure until Sunday's disputed presidential runoff in his homeland. Kurzban says the star of the "Lethal Weapon" action movies arrived Thursday, March 17, 2011. (AP Photo/Pier Paolo Cito, File)

    EDITORIAL: Court throws out attempted shakedown of Chevron

    Sometimes the facts trump greed, a defendant refuses to roll over and play dead, and a scam falls apart.

  • The trial in New York of lawyer Steven Donziger, who brought natives of the Ecuadorean Amazon to court with him in 1999, reaches a climax this week as he defends himself against charges that he engineered a record-breaking $19 billion judgment against Chevron Corp. for contamination of the Amazon rain forest. Ecuador had originally opposed the class-action suit, filed in 1993 on behalf of indigenous Indians and others. (Associated Press)

    Chevron scores court win in $9B Ecuador rainforest case

    The U.S. District Court in Manhattan on Tuesday handed Chevron Corp. a major victory in its decades-long battle over pollution in the Amazon rain forest, declaring an Ecuadorean court ruling unenforceable in the U.S.

  • FILE - In this July 25, 2011, file photo, a Chevron logo appears at a gas station in Miami. The American lawyer who advised Ecuadorean residents as they won a $9 billion judgment against Chevron Corp. says Tuesday, March 4, 2014 it's appalling that a New York judge found that the award resulted from fraud. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)

    NY judge rules for Chevron in Ecuador case

    A federal judge on Tuesday blocked U.S. courts from being used to collect a $9 billion Ecuadorean judgment against Chevron for rainforest damage, saying lawyers poisoned an honorable quest with their illegal and wrongful conduct.

  • The trial in New York of lawyer Steven Donziger, who brought natives of the Ecuadorean Amazon to court with him in 1999, reaches a climax this week as he defends himself against charges that he engineered a record-breaking $19 billion judgment against Chevron Corp. for contamination of the Amazon rain forest. Ecuador had originally opposed the class-action suit, filed in 1993 on behalf of indigenous Indians and others. (Associated Press)

    Chevron trial nears its end

    Chevron's fraud case against Steven Donziger reaches a climax this week as the New York celebrity lawyer takes the stand for the first time to defend himself against charges that he engineered a record-breaking $19 billion judgment against the oil company for contamination of the Amazon rain forest.

  • Chevron case finds trial lawyer in court after remarks caught on video

    It's a precedent-setting court case that is playing out like a soap opera. A celebrity lawyer, triumphant after winning the biggest environmental judgment in history, is in danger of causing his own downfall as he is caught on video appearing to admit to misconduct and fraud — just the latest twist in a high-stakes, decadeslong court battle over oil pollution in the Amazon rain forest.

  • A driver fuels his car at a Chevron gas station in Miami in July 2011. (Associated Press)

    EDITORIAL: Banana republic v. Chevron

    For nearly a decade, U.S. trial lawyers have been itching to capture their share of a multibillion case against Chevron.

  • With a gas mask on his head, Ecuador's President Rafael Correa, center, gestures as he runs away from tear gas during a protest of police officers and soldiers against a new law that cuts their benefits at a police base in Quito, Ecuador, Thursday, Sept. 30, 2010. There were no reports of serious violence against the government, but Correa was hospitalized due to the effects of tear gas after being shouted down and pelted with water as he tried to speak with a group of police protesters. (AP Photo/Patricio Realpe)

    EDITORIAL: Stopping the Chevron shakedown

    The State Department has done little to help an American corporation battered by a bogus multibillion dollar lawsuit filed in a foreign country. Fortunately, the Obama administration's leadership void was filled Tuesday by U.S. District Judge Lewis A. Kaplan, who issued an injunction barring any collection efforts against Chevron Corp. by Ecuador.

  • With a gas mask on his head, Ecuador's President Rafael Correa, center, gestures as he runs away from tear gas during a protest of police officers and soldiers against a new law that cuts their benefits at a police base in Quito, Ecuador, Thursday, Sept. 30, 2010. There were no reports of serious violence against the government, but Correa was hospitalized due to the effects of tear gas after being shouted down and pelted with water as he tried to speak with a group of police protesters. (AP Photo/Patricio Realpe)

    EDITORIAL: An Ecuadorian racket

    Ecuador's case against California's Chevron Corp. has boomeranged against the plaintiffs' lawyers. Today in Manhattan, federal District Judge Lewis A. Kaplan is considering a RICO (Racketeering Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) complaint Chevron filed Feb. 1 against attorneys and consultants targeting the oil giant.

  • PHOTOGRAPHS BY ROD LAMKEY JR./THE WASHINGTON TIMES
Chevron executive Silvia M. Garrigo (left) and others are renewing calls to have Ecuador's trade status with the U.S. revoked. "The only remedy [in Chevron's legal battle with Ecuador] is for the preferences to be suspended," said Chevron spokesman Kent Robertson (right).

    EDITORIAL: Assassination threat by Chevron accusers

    Courts continue to expose the skulduggery of an Ecuadorean lawsuit against American oil giant Chevron Corp. On Tuesday, the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals smacked down the plaintiffs and backed District Judge Lewis A. Kaplan's order allowing Chevron to continue discovery efforts to prove the lawsuit is fraudulent. Judge Kaplan's Nov. 4 decision in the case uses particularly scathing terms to describe the conduct of the plaintiffs' American lawyer, Steven R. Donziger.

  • Correa

    EDITORIAL: Ecuador's Chevron shakedown

    Ecuadorean Ambassador Luis Gallegos says in a letter on this page that "the government of Ecuador has no stake in the outcome of the private environmental litigation." The facts show otherwise. On multiple occasions, the president of Ecuador, Rafael Correa, has weighed in against Chevron, making clear that his government has prejudged the case that claims the country suffered grave ecological damage from energy drilling performed by Texaco before the company became part of Chevron.

  • LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Government not involved in Chevron suit

    I was surprised by your editorial "Drilling Chevron in Ecuador" (Comment & Analysis, Monday) calling on the U.S. government to come to the defense of one of the world's biggest oil companies. Chevron certainly has the resources to defend itself without the support of American taxpayers.

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