The Olympics

Latest The Olympics Items
  • FILE - In this July 28, 2012 file photo, British children pose for photos under a sculpture of the Olympics rings, in Coventry, England. Boston, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Washington are the cities still in the running for a possible U.S. bid to host the 2024 Summer Olympics. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla, File)

    D.C. among 4 U.S. cities vying for 2024 Summer Olympics

    Over the next seven months, the USOC will decide whether it even wants to try to host the Olympics, with the deadline for deciding expected in early 2015. The last two U.S. candidates both suffered humiliating fourth-place finishes: New York for the 2012 Olympics and Chicago for the 2016 Games that went to Rio de Janeiro


  • International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach, left, and Russian President Vladimir Putin watch the closing ceremony of the 2014 Winter Olympics, Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014, in Sochi, Russia. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

    LOVERRO: Quest for 2024 Olympics a race D.C. is better off losing

    Unfortunately, the powers that be in Washington are still committed to wasting more money and resources for a chance to host an event that, at the very least, will make nearly all of your lives miserable for an entire summer, or, at the very worst, send governments into economic tailspins and leave broken dreams in its wake.


  • FILE - In this file photo taken Jan. 12, 2013, Austria's Michael Hayboeck is seen soaring through the air during the qualification round of the16th World Cup Ski Jumping competition, in Zakopane, Poland. Zakopane was to be one of the sites of the 2022 Winter Games that the nearby city of Krakow was bidding to co-host, but cancelled the effort the day after the residents voted against the plan in a local referendum on Sunday, May 25, 2014. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz, file)

    IOC faces trouble finding cities to host games

    The Olympics have weathered world wars, boycotts and corruption scandals. These days, the IOC has a new crisis on its hands: Finding cities willing to host the games.


  • This May 13, 2014 aerial photo, shows the Rio 2016 Olympic golf course under construction in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Grass has been going down for several weeks at the course, which created an upbeat mood as golf prepares to return to the Olympics after a 112-year absence. That changed Saturday, May 31, 2014 when Rio organizers confirmed that a state prosecutor could halt work on the course unless the developer shows it is following environmental regulations and other requirements under Brazilian law. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

    Work on Olympic golf course could be halted

    Like other delayed venues for the beleaguered Rio 2016 Olympics, work on the golf course has fallen behind schedule.


  • FILE- In this Feb. 21, 2014, file photo, The United States' team, from left, Shani Davis, Brian Hansen and Jonathan Kuck,  follows team Russia during a warm-up prior to the start of the men's speedskating team pursuit quarterfinals at the Adler Arena Skating Center at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. After failing to win a long-track medal at the Sochi Olympics, the U.S. speedskating program did a painful self-assessment. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin, File)

    US Speedskating vows major chances heading to 2018

    Coming off one of its worst performances at the Olympics, U.S. Speedskating conducted a self-assessment and vowed major changes looking toward the 2018 Winter Games.


  • In this photo released by the International Olympic Committee (IOC), IOC President Thomas Bach, right, and Chairman and CEO of Comcast Corporation Brian L. Roberts pose for a photograph as they sign an agreement to secure the U.S. broadcast rights to the Olympics through to 2032 for NBC Universal, in Lausanne, Switzerland, Wednesday, May 7, 2014. NBC secured the U.S. broadcast rights to the Olympics through 2032 on Wednesday in a record six-games deal worth $7.75 billion. NBC already holds the rights through the 2020 Olympics in a four-games deal signed in 2011 for $4.38 billion. (AP Photo/Arnaud Meylan)

    Big money, secret talks produce Olympic TV deal

    It all started with some casual conversation over dinner at an Italian restaurant in Manhattan six months ago. It ended with an eye-popping $7.75 billion deal that will keep Olympic coffers flowing for another two decades.


  • In a photo provided by NBC Olympics, NBC's Bob Costas prepares for broadcast at an anchor desk in Sochi, Russia, Sunday, Feb. 16, 2014. Costas plans to make his return to NBC on Monday after being off the air for a week with an eye infection. (AP Photo/NBC Olympics)

    NBC keeps U.S. Olympics broadcast rights through 2032

    The latest deal was announced Wednesday after secret negotiations between the IOC and NBC. There was no auction or open bidding this time, with only NBC making an offer.


  • In this photo released by Patrick Sandusky of the United States Olympic Committee, International Olympic Committee (IOC) President Tomas Bach, right, and Chairman and CEO of Comcast Corporation Brian L. Roberts sign an agreement to secure the U.S. broadcast rights to the Olympics through to 2032 for NBC Universal, in Lausanne, Switzerland, Wednesday, May 7, 2014. NBC secured the U.S. broadcast rights to the Olympics through 2032 on Wednesday in a record six-games deal worth $7.75 billion. NBC already holds the rights through the 2020 Olympics in a four-games deal signed in 2011 for $4.38 billion. (AP Photo/Patrick Sandusky, USOC)

    NBC extends Olympic deal through 2032 for $7.75B

    The Olympics are staying on NBC in the United States through 2032 in a record $7.75 billion deal that cut out rival networks and seals the long-term financial security of the IOC.


  • FILE- In this March 20, 2014 file photo, Rio de Janeiro's Eduardo Paes, right, talks with Nawal El Moutawakel, head of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) Evaluation Commission, center, and International Olympic Committee (IOC) Executive Director for the Olympic Games, Gilbert Felli during a visit to the Olympic Park in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Earlier this month, in an unprecedented display of criticism against an Olympic host, 18 sports federations made public their widespread concerns over Rio's preparations, with some sports asking about "Plan B" contingencies for their venues. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo, File)

    Rio mayor says he won't bow to sports federations

    Rio de Janeiro's mayor has responded to the high number of complaints about the city's preparations for the 2016 Olympics by saying sports federations are making too many unnecessary demands for the games.


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