Tina Fey

Latest Tina Fey Items
  • NBC boss isn't worried about Letterman successor

    With Jimmy Fallon doing so well as "Tonight" show host, NBC's boss expressed no fear Monday about who will replace David Letterman upon the late-night comic's planned retirement from CBS sometime next year.


  • Globes leader 'American Hustle' gets Oscar boost

    The Golden Globes are typically Hollywood's bawdiest awards show - "a wonderful mess," said co-host Tina Fey of this year's bash. But in the end, after all the boozy banter - some of it bleeped for broadcast - the 1970s corruption tale "American Hustle" got a very serious push toward Oscar glory, picking up three major awards.


  • This image released by NBC shows hosts Tina Fey, left, and Amy Poehler during the 71st annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (AP Photo/NBC, Paul Drinkwater)

    Tina Fey and Amy Poehler: Golden as Globes hosts

    Tina Fey and Amy Poehler took the gold again.


  • This image released by NBC shows hosts Tina Fey, left, and Amy Poehler during the 71st annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (AP Photo/NBC, Paul Drinkwater)

    Golden Globes viewership highest in a decade

    The Nielsen ratings company says the Golden Globes awards ceremony hit a 10-year high in viewership.


  • This image released by NBC shows hosts Tina Fey, left, and Amy Poehler during the 71st annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (AP Photo/NBC, Paul Drinkwater)

    'Hustle' leads Globes as movie/TV awards provide lots of surprises

    Amy Poehler made out with Bono, Tina Fey mocked George Clooney's taste in women and Matt Damon emerged, bizarrely, as the night's recurring gag.


  • President Barack Obama talks with Carol Burnett, the 2013 recipient of the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor, and her husband Brian Miller, in the Oval Office, Oct. 21, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

    Carol Burnett receives Mark Twain Prize for humor in D.C.

    When Carol Burnett launched her namesake variety show in the 1960s, one TV executive told her the genre was "a man's game." She proved him wrong with an 11-year run that averaged 30 million viewers each week.



  • MOVIE REVIEW: ‘Admission’

    "Admission" is an off-kilter mish-mash of a romantic comedy that careens from cloyingly sweet to disarmingly bitter. It's a watchable, inoffensive date movie that suffers from a busy, multipronged plot and a lack of chemistry between the leads.


  • Capsule reviews of new movie releases

    "Admission" _ What should be a hilarious, long-overdue pairing of two hugely likable, superstar comedians ends up being a major disappointment. As much film and television work as they do individually, Tina Fey and Paul Rudd surprisingly never have worked together. In theory, her smart, zingy persona should mesh beautifully with his easygoing goofiness _ or their shared dynamic should bounce, or snap, or have some sort of life to it. Instead, Paul Weitz's direction of Karen Croner's script is tonally erratic: too fast in spots and too much of a slog in others. It certainly doesn't help that the characters feel like types without much nuance. Even reliable comic veterans like Fey and Rudd can't find much that's new or fresh in these people, and as a result they have zero chemistry with each other. Fey, as a Princeton University admissions officer, is always uptight, precise and emotionally closed-off. Rudd, as the do-gooder founder of an alternative New England high school, is always free-spirited, adventurous and open-minded. Even in the fantasy world of romantic comedies where opposites attract and sparks fly, these two have no business being together. Nat Wolff plays the odd, brilliant student who may be the son Fey's character put up for adoption as a newborn and Lily Tomlin provides the film's few moments of joy as Fey's maverick feminist mother. PG-13 for language and some sexual material. 100 minutes. One and a half stars out of four.


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