Tom Delay

Latest Tom Delay Items
  • High Texas criminal court will hear Tom DeLay case

    The overturned conviction of former U.S. House Majority Leader Tom DeLay will be reviewed by the highest criminal court in Texas.


  • DeLay: GOP failing to fight criminalization of politics

    Former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay has rejoined the fray, regaining his seat on the American Conservative Union/Conservative Political Action Conference board, taking up the sword against the progressiveism of Democrats and battling what the Texan says is the wimpishness of his fellow Republicans.


  • Former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, Texas Republican, says of his new weekly column and on-demand radio show for The Washington Times that he's "very excited about having a platform for a dialogue with the American people." (Associated Press)

    Ex-House Majority Leader Tom DeLay to join The Washington Times

    Tom DeLay, once one of the most powerful officials in Washington, will join The Washingon Times as a weekly columnist and radio personality.


  • ** FILE ** Former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay talks to reporters as he leaves a lunch meeting on Capitol Hill, Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013, in Washington. A Texas appeals court tossed the criminal conviction of DeLay on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013, saying there was insufficient evidence for a jury in 2010 to have found him guilty of illegally funneling money to Republican candidates. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Tom DeLay on Obama: His 'tyranny' is 'unbelievable and scary'

    Former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay said President Obama has crossed the constitutional line when it comes to his use of executive orders and has now entered a realm normally reserved for tyrants.


  • KNIGHT: Foiling the left's character assassination

    Reckless accusers deserve a taste of their own medicine


  • ** FILE ** Former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay talks to reporters as he leaves a lunch meeting on Capitol Hill, Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013, in Washington. A Texas appeals court tossed the criminal conviction of DeLay on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013, saying there was insufficient evidence for a jury in 2010 to have found him guilty of illegally funneling money to Republican candidates. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    High-profile cases show a pattern of misuse of prosecutorial powers

    ANALYSIS: It's hard to imagine the U.S. as a place where citizens have to fear overzealous prosecution, but last week's reversals in the cases of former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay and five New Orleans police officers are part of a troubling pattern reminiscent of the Soviet criminal justice system — a system in which the state is always right, even when it is wrong.


  • ** FILE ** Former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay talks to reporters as he leaves a lunch meeting on Capitol Hill, Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013, in Washington. A Texas appeals court tossed the criminal conviction of DeLay on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013, saying there was insufficient evidence for a jury in 2010 to have found him guilty of illegally funneling money to Republican candidates. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    PRUDEN: Happy to be the doorkeeper

    The man they called "the Hammer," who used Democrats as anvils, got a little satisfaction Thursday. An appeals court in Texas reversed the money-laundering conviction of Tom DeLay and told him to go and sin no more.


  • EDITORIAL: An abuse righted

    Retired congressmen usually have it made. They either return home for a quiet life of leisure or head to K Street for a lucrative lobbying career. Former majority leaders have their pick of seven-figure opportunities. But not always. Tom DeLay, the former Texas congressman famous for his unbending conservative ways, has spent the past decade with neither a job nor a day's rest, fighting for his very freedom. The nightmare ended Thursday.


  • ** FILE ** Former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, Texas Republican, speaks about his upcoming appeal of a money-laundering conviction at his attorney's office in Houston on Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)

    Tom DeLay: 'I can get my concealed weapons license back'

    Former Rep. Tom DeLay said not much changed after a Texas appeals court overturned his conviction Thursday and acquitted him of charges he violated campaign finance laws — except that he will have a key constitutional right restored.


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