Trent Lott

Latest Trent Lott Items
  • Former Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott sports a seersucker suit Thursday evening as he hosts Seersucker Thursday at Occidental Grill & Seafood. Mr. Lott started the tradition in 1996 as a way to promote friendly relations among senators who might disagree on political issues. The Senate canceled the June event, but he staged one anyway. (Ryan M.L. Young/The Washington Times)

    Occupation in seersucker

    Occupy Wall Street protesters had some stiff evening competition when ardent activists donned their Thursday best with suits of white-and-blue stripes, pink socks, and yellow ties.


  • Associated Press
Sen. Trent Lott, Mississippi Republican, resigned his office in December with five years remaining in his six-year term.

    GAFFNEY: False-flag operation on LOST

    Here we go again: The usual suspects - the environmentalists, the one-worlder transnationalists, the Obama administration (to the extent that is not redundant) and assorted shortsighted special interests including, regrettably, the United States Navy - are dusting off the hopelessly outdated and inequitable United Nations Law of the Sea Treaty (better, and more accurately, known as LOST) in the hope of jamming its ratification through the Senate as was done two years ago with the defective New Start Treaty.


  • Former Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott is one of several ex-members of Congress to become a successful lobbyist. (Associated Press)

    Inside the Beltway

    "This is going to be tough. But I just want to remind all of you that you didn't decide to support Barack Hussein Obama because it was going to be easy."


  • Sen. Lott's foot-in-the-mouth problem

    With his buffoonish complaints about talk radio and its role in educating the American public about the flaws in the Senate immigration bill, Senate Minority Whip Trent Lott has done much to energize the conservative Republican base and jeopardize the chances of its passage. Earlier this month, open-borders advocates came up 15 votes short when they attempted to shut off debate on the immigration bill, and nothing that has taken place since that time leads us to believe that the Bipartisan Alien Amnesty Caucus will fare much better on tomorrow's cloture vote — the most critical one on illegal immigration during the current Congress. If open-borders advocates fail again tomorrow, don't be surprised if President Bush and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, their poll ratings already abysmal, conclude that this isn't the way to build their respective political legacies.


  • GOP reversal on surge could open way for pullout

    THE WASHINGTON TIMES


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