Topic - Ulysses S. Grant

Subscribe to this topic via RSS or ATOM
Related Stories
  • St. Louis to host Ulysses Grant symposium

    Presidential scholars and history buffs will gather in downtown St. Louis this weekend to commemorate the historical and political legacy of Ulysses S. Grant, the Civil War general and 18th U.S. president.

  • BOOK REVIEW: ‘Terrible Swift Sword’

    If Ulysses Grant was the prototypical Dwight Eisenhower, and if William T. Sherman foreshadowed Omar Bradley, then it is not too much of a stretch to call Philip Sheridan the George Patton of the Union armies of the Civil War -- minus the ego-driven tantrums.

  • For President Obama's first inauguration four years ago, a steam vent on the Mall keeps people warm in the early morning of Jan. 20, hours before the ceremony. The forecast for Monday's swearing-in is temperatures in the mid- to upper 30s. (Associated Press)

    Inauguration Day has a chilly history

    President Obama's second inauguration likely will play out against better weather than his first one did, escaping some of the historically bad D.C. conditions that have plagued past presidential swearings-in.

  • BOOK REVIEW: 'A Disposition To Be Rich'

    In a fore-note to his vastly entertaining and readable book, Geoffrey Ward quotes an epigram from George Bernard Shaw: "If you cannot get rid of the family skeleton, you may as well make it dance."

  • BOOK REVIEW: 'Victors in Blue'

    Some publishers promise readers through exaggerated book titles more than the authors intend. This can lead to cases of buyer's remorse. Happily, it is not the case with "Victors in Blue," which, despite its faintly misleading subtitle, is still a valuable addition to anyone's Civil War library and a treat to read.

  • ** FILE ** In this Feb. 24, 2012, photo, a detail photo shows Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's brass epaulets that he wore on formal occasions while a professor at the Virginia Military Institute in Richmond, Va. (AP Photo/Richmond Times-Dispatch, Dean Hoffmeyer)

    Lee's sword at new Appomattox museum

    The sword Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee had at his side when he surrendered to Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant is returning to Appomattox as the centerpiece of a new museum examining the post-Civil War struggle to heal the nation.

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Museum of the Confederacy has the sword of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. The restored sword will be displayed in Richmond until a satellite exhibition space is completed at Appomattox, Va. It will be less than a mile from where Lee met with Grant to sign the document of surrender on April 9, 1865.

    Lee sword returning to Appomattox

    It's an enduring myth of the Civil War: Robert E. Lee surrendered his sword to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox, and his Union counterpart refused the traditional gesture of surrender.

  • The grave marker where the arm of Gen. Stonewall Jackson reportedly is buried is near the site where Wal-Mart proposed to build a Supercenter. (Associated Press)

    Wal-Mart drops store plan near Va. Civil War site

    Under withering opposition from hundreds of historians, Wal-Mart Stores Inc. abruptly abandoned plans Wednesday to build a Supercenter near a hallowed Civil War site where Robert E. Lee first met Ulysses S. Grant on the field of battle in 1864.

  • Civil War message opened, decoded: No help coming

    A glass vial stopped with a cork during the Civil War has been opened, revealing a coded message to the desperate Confederate commander in Vicksburg on the day the Mississippi city fell to Union forces 147 years ago

  • Valley's role often overlooked

    Virginia's Shenandoah Valley was a secondary theater for most of the Civil War.

  • Collectors covet Civil War items

    It was stitched in simple crimson and blue silk by a loving wife for her husband. Yesterday, the swallow-tailed cavalry battle flag sold for just under $900,000 during an auction of Civil War memorabilia in Gettysburg, Pa., that included both the mundane and magnificent.

More Stories →

Quotations
  • "Like any good poker player," Mr. McManus writes, "Grant had a knack for capitalizing on the overly passive or aggressive tendencies of rebel generals," many of whom he knew from West Point. "He could tell bluff and bluster from real courage."

    BOOKS: 'Cowboys Full' →

  • He also hinted that insider information gleaned from prominent Wall Street figures enabled him to earn high returns.

    BOOK REVIEW: 'A Disposition To Be Rich' →

Happening Now