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United States Agency For International Development

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In this March 3, 2014, photo, a woman uses her cellphone in Camajuani, Cuba. The U.S. Agency for International Development masterminded the creation of a "Cuban Twitter," a communications network designed to undermine the communist government in Cuba, built with secret shell companies and financed through foreign banks, The Associated Press has learned. The project, which lasted more than two years and drew tens of thousands of subscribers, sought to evade Cuba’s stranglehold on the Internet with a primitive social media platform. Its users were neither aware it was created by a U.S. agency with ties to the State Department, nor that American contractors were gathering personal data about them. (AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)

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**FILE** Rep. Nita Lowey, New York Democrat and ranking member of the House subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs, questions US Agency for International Development (USAID) Administrator Dr. Rajiv Shah, on Capitol Hill in Washington on April 8, 2014. Shah testified on USAID's fiscal 2015 budget request but was questioned on the agency’s secret 'Cuban Twitter', a social media network built to stir unrest in the communist island. (Associated Press)

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**FILE** Rep. Nita Lowey, New York Democrat and ranking member of the House subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs, questions US Agency for International Development (USAID) Administrator Dr. Rajiv Shah, on Capitol Hill in Washington on April 8, 2014. Shah testified on USAID's fiscal 2015 budget request but was questioned on the agency’s secret 'Cuban Twitter', a social media network built to stir unrest in the communist island. (Associated Press)

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Rep. Jason Chaffetz, the Utah Republican who heads the House Oversight and Government Reform subcommittee overseeing the USAID spending in Afghanistan, told The Washington Times that he first learned of the fund during a heated exchange with the agency's top official in the region last week and immediately thought, "Something here doesn't smell right." (Associated Press)

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Associated Press Rep. Jason Chaffetz, the Utah Republican who heads the House Oversight and Government Reform subcommittee overseeing the USAID spending in Afghanistan, told The Washington Times that he first learned of the fund during a heated exchange with the agency's top official in the region last week and immediately thought, "Something here doesn't smell right."

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Rep. Jason Chaffetz, the Utah Republican who heads the House Oversight and Government Reform subcommittee overseeing the USAID spending in Afghanistan, told The Washington Times that he first learned of the fund during a heated exchange with the agency's top official in the region last week and immediately thought, "Something here doesn't smell right." (Associated Press)