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trump_fbi_53542.jpg

From left, acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe, CIA Director Mike Pompeo, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, National Security Agency Director Adm. Michael Rogers, Defense Intelligence Agency Director Lt. Gen. Vincent Stewart, and National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) Director Robert Cardillo, prepare to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, May 11, 2017, before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on major threats facing the U.S. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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FILE - This April 13, 2016, file photo shows the seal of the Central Intelligence Agency at CIA headquarters in Langley, Va. WikiLeaks’ release of nearly 8,000 documents that purportedly reveal secrets about the CIA’s tools for breaking into computers, cellphones and even smart TVs has given rise to multiple theories about whodunit and why. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

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Illustration on CIA spying by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

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This April 13, 2016, file photo shows the seal of the Central Intelligence Agency at CIA headquarters in Langley, Va. Everything from your TV to your lights and shades can be controlled by an app on your phone or even your voice. But the allegation that the CIA and MI5 commandeered some Samsung smart TVs to work as listening devices is a reminder that inviting these "conveniences" into your home comes with a risk. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

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CIA Bullies Trump Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

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In this Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017, file photo, CIA Director-designate Rep. Michael Pompeo, R-Kan., testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee. CIA Chief Mike Pompeo is scheduled to arrive Thursday, Feb. 9, in Turkey to discuss security issues on his first overseas trip in his new role (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, file)

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In this Jan. 21, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump, background, speaks at the Central Intelligence Agency in Langley, Va. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

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Screen capture from a livestream of President Trump's Jan. 21, 2017 remarks at CIA headquarters in Langley, Va. (YouTube)

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The Disgrace of the CIA Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

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Brennan: Wizard of the CIA Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

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Former President George H.W. Bush visited the CIA on Friday to mark the 40th anniversary of his swearing in as the Agency's director in 1976. (CIA)

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GENERAL ATOMICS MQ-1 PREDATOR Role: Remote piloted aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicle Manufacturer: General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Status: In service The General Atomics MQ-1 Predator is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) built by General Atomics and used primarily by the United States Air Force (USAF) and Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Initially conceived in the early 1990s for aerial reconnaissance and forward observation roles, the Predator carries cameras and other sensors but has been modified and upgraded to carry and fire two AGM-114 Hellfire missiles or other munitions (Unmanned combat aerial vehicle). The aircraft, in use since 1995, has seen combat over Afghanistan,Pakistan, Bosnia, Serbia, Iraq, Yemen, Libya, Syria, and Somalia. The USAF describes the Predator as a "Tier II" MALE UAS (medium-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aircraft system). The UAS consists of four aircraft or "air vehicles" with sensors, a ground control station (GCS), and a primary satellite link communication suite. Powered by a Rotax engine and driven by a propeller, the air vehicle can fly up to 400 nmi (460 mi; 740 km) to a target, loiter overhead for 14 hours, then return to its base. Following 2001, the RQ-1 Predator became the primary unmanned aircraft used for offensive operations by the USAF and the CIA in Afghanistan and the Pakistani tribal areas; it has also been deployed elsewhere. Because offensive uses of the Predator are classified, U.S. military officials have reported an appreciation for the intelligence and reconnaissance-gathering abilities of UAVs but declined to publicly discuss their offensive use. Civilian applications have included border enforcement and scientific studies, and to monitor wind direction and other characteristics of large forest fires (such as the one that was used by the California Air National Guard in the August 2013 Rim Fire). (U.S. Air Force photo/Lt Col Leslie Pratt)

MQ-1_Predator_unmanned_aircraft

MQ-1_Predator_unmanned_aircraft

GENERAL ATOMICS MQ-1 PREDATOR Role: Remote piloted aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicle Manufacturer: General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Status: In service The General Atomics MQ-1 Predator is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) built by General Atomics and used primarily by the United States Air Force (USAF) and Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Initially conceived in the early 1990s for aerial reconnaissance and forward observation roles, the Predator carries cameras and other sensors but has been modified and upgraded to carry and fire two AGM-114 Hellfire missiles or other munitions (Unmanned combat aerial vehicle). The aircraft, in use since 1995, has seen combat over Afghanistan,Pakistan, Bosnia, Serbia, Iraq, Yemen, Libya, Syria, and Somalia. The USAF describes the Predator as a "Tier II" MALE UAS (medium-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aircraft system). The UAS consists of four aircraft or "air vehicles" with sensors, a ground control station (GCS), and a primary satellite link communication suite. Powered by a Rotax engine and driven by a propeller, the air vehicle can fly up to 400 nmi (460 mi; 740 km) to a target, loiter overhead for 14 hours, then return to its base. Following 2001, the RQ-1 Predator became the primary unmanned aircraft used for offensive operations by the USAF and the CIA in Afghanistan and the Pakistani tribal areas; it has also been deployed elsewhere. Because offensive uses of the Predator are classified, U.S. military officials have reported an appreciation for the intelligence and reconnaissance-gathering abilities of UAVs but declined to publicly discuss their offensive use. Civilian applications have included border enforcement and scientific studies, and to monitor wind direction and other characteristics of large forest fires (such as the one that was used by the California Air National Guard in the August 2013 Rim Fire). (U.S. Air Force photo/Lt Col Leslie Pratt)

MQ-1_Predator_unmanned_aircraft

MQ-1_Predator_unmanned_aircraft

GENERAL ATOMICS MQ-1 PREDATOR Role: Remote piloted aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicle Manufacturer: General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Status: In service The General Atomics MQ-1 Predator is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) built by General Atomics and used primarily by the United States Air Force (USAF) and Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Initially conceived in the early 1990s for aerial reconnaissance and forward observation roles, the Predator carries cameras and other sensors but has been modified and upgraded to carry and fire two AGM-114 Hellfire missiles or other munitions (Unmanned combat aerial vehicle). The aircraft, in use since 1995, has seen combat over Afghanistan,Pakistan, Bosnia, Serbia, Iraq, Yemen, Libya, Syria, and Somalia. The USAF describes the Predator as a "Tier II" MALE UAS (medium-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aircraft system). The UAS consists of four aircraft or "air vehicles" with sensors, a ground control station (GCS), and a primary satellite link communication suite. Powered by a Rotax engine and driven by a propeller, the air vehicle can fly up to 400 nmi (460 mi; 740 km) to a target, loiter overhead for 14 hours, then return to its base. Following 2001, the RQ-1 Predator became the primary unmanned aircraft used for offensive operations by the USAF and the CIA in Afghanistan and the Pakistani tribal areas; it has also been deployed elsewhere. Because offensive uses of the Predator are classified, U.S. military officials have reported an appreciation for the intelligence and reconnaissance-gathering abilities of UAVs but declined to publicly discuss their offensive use. Civilian applications have included border enforcement and scientific studies, and to monitor wind direction and other characteristics of large forest fires (such as the one that was used by the California Air National Guard in the August 2013 Rim Fire). (U.S. Air Force photo/Lt Col Leslie Pratt)

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(AP Photo/CIA) ** FILE **

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Leon Panetta, former US Representative from California, White House Chief of Staff, Director of the CIA and US Secretary of Defense - After serving in the Army and working for Republican Sen. Thomas Kuchel, Panetta was named as the director of the Office of Civil Rights in the Nixon administration in 1969. He was later forced out of that position and switched his party affiliation to Democrat. He went on to serve as a US Congressman, as President Clinton's Chief of Staff, and as Director of the CIA and Defense Secretary in the Obama Administration.

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The U.S. government's assertion that Osama bin Laden's courier tipped off the CIA about the location of the terrorist leader's Abbottabad compound was a cover story to protect the Pakistani official that actually provided the information, a Special Forces operator told NBC News. (Associated Press)

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Former CIA officer Jeffrey Sterling leaves federal court in Alexandria, Va., in this Jan. 26, 2015, file photo. (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf, File)

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Reorganization of the CIA Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

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CIA Director John Brennan addresses a meeting at the Council on Foreign Relations, in New York, Friday, March 13, 2015. Brennan has ordered a sweeping reorganization of the CIA, an overhaul designed to make its leaders more accountable and close espionage gaps amid widespread concerns about the U.S. spy agency's limited insights into a series of major global developments. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)