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The Marine Corps' classic recruiting slogan, "The Few. The Proud. The Marines," may end with a new advertising campaign approved by Commandant Gen. Robert Neller. (Instagram, United States Marine Corps)

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Female recruits stand at the Marine Corps Training Depot on Parris Island, S.C. (Associated Press)

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Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command will now have its own insignia, which features the motto "Spiritus Invictus," or unconquerable spirit. (U.S. Marine Corps)

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U.S. Marine Corps 2nd Lt. Daniel Mora trains at the Jungle Warfare Training Center on Camp Gonsalves, Okinawa, Japan, Aug. 21, 2009. (U.S. Marine Corps) ** FILE **

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Hon. mention in the Sports Photography category: U.S. Marine Corps recruits help their teammates put on gear before pugil stick fighting training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot in Parris Island, S.C., Dec. 3, 2015. The training teaches recruits the importance of knowing how to fight as well as how to work together in order to succeed. IMAGE: STAFF SGT. MARIANIQUE SANTOS, USMC

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Marine recruits practice techniques from the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program at Parris Island, South Carolina. (U.S. Marine Corps)

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As the Marine Corps readies to accept females in the infantry, the branch's commandant is handing down a "cultural change" program for gender integration. (U.S. Marine Corps)

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MARINES - Bell AH-1Z Viper is a twin-engine attack helicopter based on the AH-1W SuperCobra, that was developed for the United States Marine Corps. The AH-1Z features a four-blade, bearingless, composite main rotor system, uprated transmission, and a new target sighting system. The AH-1Z is part of the H-1 upgrade program. It is also called "Zulu Cobra" in reference to its variant letter. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Preston Reed)

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Recruiting video for Marine Corps Officer Helicopter Pilots to apply for HMX-1 out of Quantico, Va. (Video: White House Communications Agency) ** FILE **

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Sgt. Roberto Martinez, a martial arts instructor at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., initiates a pugil stick match during training July 8, 2013. Each recruit participated in two matches. Recruits train with pugil sticks, which represent rifles with attached bayonets, to simulate close-range encounter with an enemy. Bayonet training, along with other hand-to-hand fighting skills, is encompassed in the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which contributes to the mental, character and physical development of Marines. Approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of men and 100 percent of women in the Marine Corps. Martinez is from West Covina, Calif. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. David Bessey)

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Sgt. Justin Glenn Burnside motivates a recruit with Echo Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Burnside, originally a signal intelligence specialist from Bristol Fla., is one of about 600 drill instructors who shape the approximately 20,000 recruits through Parris Island annually into United States Marines. This handful of dedicated DIs is entrusted with sustaining a more than 237-year legacy. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. David Bessey)

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Recruits of Company D, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, climb a rope as their last segment of the obstacle course aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego Feb. 28. After the rope climbing, recruits were required to conduct fireman's carries and buddy drags. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Walter D. Marino)

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Marines with India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, wait to march onto Peatross Parade Deck during a graduation ceremony aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., April 13, 2012. The graduation ceremony consisted of five platoons from India Company. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Aneshea Yee)

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Sgt. Jonathan B. Reeves currently serves as a Marine Corps drill instructor with Platoon 1085, Charlie Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Reeves joined the Marine Corps in September 2009 and became a drill instructor in January 2015. Reeves is a native of Augusta, Ga. About 600 Marine Corps drill instructors shape the approximately 20,000 recruits who come to Parris Island annually into basic United States Marines. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Pfc Aaron Bolser)

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Sgt. Michael Nygaard, a drill instructor for Platoon 3044, India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, roams the barracks moments before waking his recruits for their first official training day March 25, 2014, at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Recruits spent the morning getting dressed, experiencing their first incentive training session, cleaning their barracks, and, finally, eating a nutritious breakfast. The formal 70-day training schedule begins about one week after recruits arrive. Nygaard, 29, is from Cape Coral, Fla. India Company is scheduled to graduate June 13, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink/Released)

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Rct. Brock Willingham, Platoon 1024, Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, responds to his drill instructor as he changes positions on a Confidence Course obstacle Feb. 25, 2014, on Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. For this obstacle, recruits had to change positions twice as they slid across a horizontal rope that hovered over a shallow pond. Willingham, a 22-year-old from Augusta, Ga., is scheduled to graduate May 2, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis/Released)

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Recruits of Platoon 1022, Charlie Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, stand in formation during their initial drill evaluation Feb. 10, 2014, at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. During the evaluation, recruits performed a series of precision drill movements and could only move when ordered. The platoons will be evaluated again a week before graduation. Charlie Company is scheduled to graduate April 4, 2014. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis/Released)

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Recruits of India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, crawl through a simulated battlefield Jan. 24, 2014, as part of a combat training course on Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. This course is part of Basic Warrior Training and develops recruits’ newly learned combat skills such as tactical communication and movement. While on Parris Island, recruits receive basic combat training skills that will be built upon throughout their Marine Corps careers. India Company is scheduled to graduate Feb. 14, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink/Released)

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Recruit Leon R. Agosto of Company I, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, practices the high block technique during the Bayonet Assault Course, aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego, Calif., Jan. 9, 2013. The Marine Corps Martial Arts Program is taught throughout Recruit training and focuses on instilling a warrior mindset and teaching close quarters combat skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jericho W. Crutcher/Released)

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Recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, change positions above a small pond on the Confidence Course Nov. 7, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. The course is comprised of 15 obstacles designed to help Marine Corps recruits build confidence by overcoming physical challenges. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)