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This undated still image from a TV advertisement provided by the U.S. Marine Corps, is part of a new recruitment ad campaign by the Corps, meant to draw millennials by showing Marines as not only strong warriors but good citizens. "Battles Won" is the name of the campaign that includes TV ads and online clips of Marines unloading "Toys for Tots" boxes and real video of a Marine veteran tackling an armed robber. The military's smallest branch is also considering replacing its iconic slogan, "The Few. The Proud. The Marines." (U.S. Marine Corps via AP)

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This undated still image taken from video for a TV advertisement, provided by the U.S. Marine Corps, is part of a new recruitment ad campaign by the Corps, meant to draw millennials by showing Marines as not only strong warriors but good citizens. "Battles Won" is the name of the campaign that includes TV ads and online clips of Marines unloading "Toys for Tots" boxes and real video of a Marine veteran tackling an armed robber. The military's smallest branch is also considering replacing its iconic slogan, "The Few. The Proud. The Marines." (U.S. Marine Corps via AP)

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This undated image provided by the U.S. Marine Corps, shows a billboard the Corps will post as part of a new recruitment advertisement campaign, meant to draw millennials by showing Marines as not only strong warriors but good citizens. "Battles Won" is the name of the campaign that includes TV ads and online clips of Marines unloading "Toys for Tots" boxes and real video of a Marine veteran tackling an armed robber. The military's smallest branch is also considering replacing its iconic slogan, "The Few. The Proud. The Marines." (U.S. Marine Corps via AP)

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This undated image provided by the U.S. Marine Corps, shows a billboard that the Corps will post as part of a new recruitment advertisement campaign, meant to draw millennials by showing Marines as not only strong warriors but good citizens. "Battles Won" is the name of the campaign that includes TV ads and online clips of Marines unloading "Toys for Tots" boxes and real footage of a Marine veteran intercepting a robbery. The military's smallest branch is also considering replacing its iconic slogan, "The Few. The Proud. The Marines." (U.S. Marine Corps via AP)

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marines_new_brand_59086.jpg

This undated image provided by the U.S. Marine Corps shows a billboard that the Corps will post as part of a new recruitment advertisement campaign, meant to draw millennials by showing Marines as not only strong warriors but good citizens. "Battles Won" is the name of the campaign that includes TV ads and online clips of Marines unloading "Toys for Tots" boxes and real video of a Marine veteran tackling an armed robber. The military's smallest branch is also considering replacing its iconic slogan, "The Few. The Proud. The Marines." (U.S. Marine Corps via AP)

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A scout sniper with the U.S. Marine Corps trains in Rabkut, Oman, on Feb. 19, 2017. (U.S. Marine Corps) ** FILE **

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FILE- In this May 5, 2014, file photo, a U.S. Marine Corps Color Guard stands under a Marine Corps emblem in Jupiter, Fla. The Defense Department is investigating reports that some Marines shared naked photographs of female Marines, veterans and other women on a secret Facebook page, some of which were taken without their knowledge. Marine Corps Commandant Gen. Robert B. Neller on Sunday, March 5, 2017, called the online activity "distasteful" and says it shows an "absence of respect." (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)

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In this image provided by the U.S. Marine Corps, Vice Adm. Robert S. Harward, commanding officer of Combined Joint Interagency Task Force 435, speaks to an Afghan official during his visit to Zaranj, Afghanistan, Jan 6, 2011. Harward has turned down an offer to be President Donald Trump's new national security adviser, the latest blow to a new administration struggling to find its footing. A senior White House official said Feb. 16, 2017, that Harward had turned the offer down due to financial and family commitments. (Sgt. Shawn Coolman/U.S. Marine Corps via AP)

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The Marine Corps' classic recruiting slogan, "The Few. The Proud. The Marines," may end with a new advertising campaign approved by Commandant Gen. Robert Neller. (Instagram, United States Marine Corps)

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Female recruits stand at the Marine Corps Training Depot on Parris Island, S.C. (Associated Press)

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Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command will now have its own insignia, which features the motto "Spiritus Invictus," or unconquerable spirit. (U.S. Marine Corps)

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U.S. Marine Corps 2nd Lt. Daniel Mora trains at the Jungle Warfare Training Center on Camp Gonsalves, Okinawa, Japan, Aug. 21, 2009. (U.S. Marine Corps) ** FILE **

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Hon. mention in the Sports Photography category: U.S. Marine Corps recruits help their teammates put on gear before pugil stick fighting training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot in Parris Island, S.C., Dec. 3, 2015. The training teaches recruits the importance of knowing how to fight as well as how to work together in order to succeed. IMAGE: STAFF SGT. MARIANIQUE SANTOS, USMC

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Marine recruits practice techniques from the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program at Parris Island, South Carolina. (U.S. Marine Corps)

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As the Marine Corps readies to accept females in the infantry, the branch's commandant is handing down a "cultural change" program for gender integration. (U.S. Marine Corps)

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MARINES - Bell AH-1Z Viper is a twin-engine attack helicopter based on the AH-1W SuperCobra, that was developed for the United States Marine Corps. The AH-1Z features a four-blade, bearingless, composite main rotor system, uprated transmission, and a new target sighting system. The AH-1Z is part of the H-1 upgrade program. It is also called "Zulu Cobra" in reference to its variant letter. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Preston Reed)

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Recruiting video for Marine Corps Officer Helicopter Pilots to apply for HMX-1 out of Quantico, Va. (Video: White House Communications Agency) ** FILE **

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Sgt. Roberto Martinez, a martial arts instructor at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., initiates a pugil stick match during training July 8, 2013. Each recruit participated in two matches. Recruits train with pugil sticks, which represent rifles with attached bayonets, to simulate close-range encounter with an enemy. Bayonet training, along with other hand-to-hand fighting skills, is encompassed in the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which contributes to the mental, character and physical development of Marines. Approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of men and 100 percent of women in the Marine Corps. Martinez is from West Covina, Calif. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. David Bessey)

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Sgt. Justin Glenn Burnside motivates a recruit with Echo Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Burnside, originally a signal intelligence specialist from Bristol Fla., is one of about 600 drill instructors who shape the approximately 20,000 recruits through Parris Island annually into United States Marines. This handful of dedicated DIs is entrusted with sustaining a more than 237-year legacy. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. David Bessey)

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Recruits of Company D, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, climb a rope as their last segment of the obstacle course aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego Feb. 28. After the rope climbing, recruits were required to conduct fireman's carries and buddy drags. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Walter D. Marino)