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Blue Angels.jpg

Image: Twitter, Lt. Commander Nate Barton, U.S. Navy

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AP450201095_10

A few hours after the U.S. Marines gained a foothold on the island, war supplies are being unloaded from Coast Guard and U.S. Navy landing crafts onto the shore of Iwo Jima, in February 1945. (AP Photo)

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This August 1943 photo provided by the National Archives, General Records of the U.S. Navy, shows a submarine builder at Electric Boat Company in Groton, Conn. The photo is part of "The Way We Worked", part of the Smithsonian's Museum on Main Street program — and opens Saturday, May 17, 2014 in Angola and 270 miles away in Tunica, Mississippi. Identical exhibits also are being shown in Rhode Island, Michigan and California. (AP Photo/Fenno Jacobs, National Archives, General Records of the U.S. Navy)

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Rep. Ralph Hall, Texas Republican and a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier pilot from 1942-45, is among lawmakers headed to a salute to members of Congress who are also vets. (Associated Press)

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Rep. Ralph Hall, Texas Republican and a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier pilot from 1942-45, is among lawmakers headed to a salute to members of Congress who are also vets. (Associated Press)

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A U.S. Navy BQM-74E drone launches from the flight deck of the guided missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) during a live fire exercise Sept. 21, 2012, in the Caribbean Sea as part of Unitas Atlantic phase 53-12. Unitas, Latin for "unity," is an annual U.S. Southern Command-sponsored, multinational naval exercise designed to enhance security cooperation and improve coalition operations between South American and U.S. maritime forces. (DoD photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Stuart Phillips, U.S. Navy/Released)

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** FILE ** A U.S. Navy BQM-74E drone launches from the flight deck of the guided missile frigate USS Underwood (FFG 36) during a live fire exercise Sept. 21, 2012, in the Caribbean Sea as part of Unitas Atlantic phase 53-12. Unitas, Latin for "unity," is an annual U.S. Southern Command-sponsored, multinational naval exercise designed to enhance security cooperation and improve coalition operations between South American and U.S. maritime forces. (DoD photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Stuart Phillips, U.S. Navy/Released)

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U.S. Navy SEALs in action. (U.S. Navy photo)

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x-47b_primary_image.jpg

The Northrop Grumman X-47B is a demonstration unmanned combat air vehicle (UCAV) designed for carrier-based operations. Developed by the American defense technology company Northrop Grumman, the X-47 project began as part of DARPA's J-UCAS program, and is now part of the United States Navy's Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstration (UCAS-D) program. The X-47B first flew in 2011, and as of 2013, it is undergoing flight testing, having successfully performed a series of land- and carrier-based demonstrations. Northrop Grumman intends to develop the prototype X-47B into a battlefield-ready aircraft, the Unmanned Carrier-Launched Surveillance and Strike (UCLASS) system, which will enter service by 2019. ATLANTIC OCEAN (May 14, 2013) An X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System (UCAS) demonstrator flies near the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). George H.W. Bush is the first aircraft carrier to successfully catapult launch an unmanned aircraft from its flight deck. (U.S. Navy photo by Erik Hildebrandt/Released)

X-47B

X-47B

The Northrop Grumman X-47B is a demonstration unmanned combat air vehicle (UCAV) designed for carrier-based operations. Developed by the American defense technology company Northrop Grumman, the X-47 project began as part of DARPA's J-UCAS program, and is now part of the United States Navy's Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstration (UCAS-D) program. The X-47B first flew in 2011, and as of 2013, it is undergoing flight testing, having successfully performed a series of land- and carrier-based demonstrations. Northrop Grumman intends to develop the prototype X-47B into a battlefield-ready aircraft, the Unmanned Carrier-Launched Surveillance and Strike (UCLASS) system, which will enter service by 2019. ATLANTIC OCEAN (May 14, 2013) An X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System (UCAS) demonstrator flies near the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). George H.W. Bush is the first aircraft carrier to successfully catapult launch an unmanned aircraft from its flight deck. (U.S. Navy photo by Erik Hildebrandt/Released)

MQ-4C_Triton

MQ-4C_Triton

The Northrop Grumman MQ-4C Triton is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) under development for the United States Navy as a surveillance aircraft. In tandem with its associated ground control station, it is considered an unmanned aircraft system (UAS). Developed under the Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) program, the system is intended to provide real-time intelligence, reconnaissance missions (ISR) over vast ocean and coastal regions,continuous maritime surveillance, as well as search and rescue missions, for the U.S. Navy, and to complement the Boeing P-8 Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft. Triton builds on elements of the Global Hawk UAS while incorporating reinforcements to the air frame and wing, along with de-icing and lightning protection systems. These capabilities allow the aircraft to descend through cloud layers to gain a closer view of ships and other targets at sea when needed. The current sensor suits allow ships to be tracked over time by gathering information on their speed, location, and classification. The MQ-4C System Development and Demonstration (SDD) aircraft was delivered in 2012 and the MQ-4C UAS was originally expected to be operational by late 2015 with a total of 68 aircraft to be procured. However, in April 2013, the Navy announced that production has shifted from FY14 to FY15 due to additional testing requirements and technical issues related to the aircraft's double-tail vertical stabilizer and rudder, and software integration for maritime sensors.[7] According to the latest information available from the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR), the Initial Operational Capability (IOC) for the MQ-4C UAS is now planned for 2017. PALMDALE, Calif. (May 21, 2013) Two Northrop Grumman MQ-4C Triton unmanned aerial vehicles are seen on the tarmac at a Northrop Grumman test facility in Palmdale, Calif. Triton is undergoing flight testing as an unmanned maritime surveillance vehicle. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Northrop Grumman by Chad Slattery/R

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Sailors with the U.S. Navy stand for the national anthem before a baseball game between the Miami Marlins and Atlanta Braves, Wednesday, April 30, 2014, in Miami. (AP Photo)

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** FILE ** North Dakota (SSN-784), the U.S. Navy's newest and most advanced nuclear attack submarine. (General Dynamics)

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North Dakota General Dynamics.jpg

** FILE ** North Dakota (SSN-784), the U.S. Navy's newest and most advanced nuclear attack submarine. (General Dynamics)

F-4_Phantom

F-4_Phantom

10. F-4 PHANTOM The McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II[N 1] is a tandem two-seat, twin-engine, all-weather, long-range supersonic jet interceptor fighter/fighter-bomber originally developed for the United States Navy by McDonnell Aircraft.[1] It first entered service in 1960 with the U.S. Navy. Proving highly adaptable, it was also adopted by the U.S. Marine Corps and the U.S. Air Force, and by the mid-1960s had become a major part of their respective air wings. The Phantom is a large fighter with a top speed of over Mach 2.2. It can carry over 18,000 pounds (8,400 kg) of weapons on nine external hardpoints, including air-to-air missiles, air-to-ground missiles, and various bombs. The F-4, like other interceptors of its time, was designed without an internal cannon. Later models incorporated a M61 Vulcan rotary cannon. Beginning in 1959 it set 15 world records for in-flight performance,[3] including an absolute speed record, and an absolute altitude record. During the Vietnam War the F-4 was used extensively; it served as the principal air superiority fighter for both the Navy and Air Force, and became important in the ground-attack and reconnaissance roles late in the war. The Phantom has the distinction of being the last U.S. fighter flown to attain ace status in the 20th century. During the Vietnam War the USAF had one pilot and two weapon systems officers (WSOs),[5] and the US Navy one pilot and one radar intercept officer (RIO), achieve five aerial kills against other enemy fighter aircraft and become aces in air-to-air combat.[6] The F-4 continued to form a major part of U.S. military air power throughout the 1970s and 1980s, being gradually replaced by more modern aircraft such as the F-15 Eagle and F-16 in the U.S. Air Force; the Grumman F-14 Tomcat in the U.S. Navy and the F/A-18 Hornet in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps.The F-4 Phantom II remained in use by the U.S. in the reconnaissance and Wild Weasel (suppression of enemy air defenses) roles in the 1

F-14_Tomcat

F-14_Tomcat

9. F-14 TOMCAT The Grumman F-14 Tomcat is a supersonic, twinjet, two-seat, variable-sweep wing fighter aircraft. The Tomcat was developed for the United States Navy's Naval Fighter Experimental (VFX) program following the collapse of the F-111B project. The F-14 was the first of the American teen-series fighters which were designed incorporating the experience of air combat against MiG fighters during the Vietnam War. The F-14 first flew in December 1970 and made its first deployment in 1974 with the U.S. Navy aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65), replacing the McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II. The F-14 served as the U.S. Navy's primary maritime air superiority fighter, fleet defense interceptor and tactical reconnaissance platform. In the 1990s, it added the Low Altitude Navigation and Targeting Infrared for Night (LANTIRN) pod system and began performing precision ground-attack missions.The Tomcat was retired from the U.S. Navy's active fleet on 22 September 2006, having been supplanted by the Boeing F/A-18E and F Super Hornets. As of 2014, the F-14 was only in service with the Islamic Republic of Iran Air Force, having been exported to Iran in 1976, when the U.S. had amicable diplomatic relations with Iran. In this photo released by the U.S. Navy, an F-14D Tomcat from Fighter Squadron Three One (VF-31), performs a fly by past the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) in the Atlantic Ocean on June 19, 2006. For the past 30 years, the F-14 Tomcat has assured U.S. air superiority, playing a key role in ensuring victory and preserving peace around the world. The F-14 Tomcat will be removed from service and officially stricken from the inventory in September of 2006. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy,Dale Miller)

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This undated photo made by the U.S. Navy and provided by the family of Mark Mayo shows military policeman Mark Mayo, who was killed Tuesday, March 25, 2014 when a civilian approached a destroyer docked at Naval Station Norfolk in Norfolk, Va., and disarmed a sailor on watch. The civilian then shot Mayo when he came to help. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy)