Topic - United States Senate Select Committee On Intelligence

Subscribe to this topic via RSS or ATOM
Related Stories
  • Kool-Aid Water Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

    JONES: Bringing transparency to detainee treatment

    Eleven members of the committee, Republicans and Democrats alike, voted to declassify the executive summary, findings and conclusions (more than 500 pages) of the committee's oversight report.

  • Illustration on James Clapper and the NSA by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

    NAPOLITANO: NSA wrongdoing revealed

    Last week, Director of National Intelligence Gen. James R. Clapper sent a brief letter to Sen. Ron Wyden, Oregon Democrat, a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee.

  • US officials reject Rubio claim about CIA report

    The State Department is seeking the declassification of a 10-month-old letter expressing its concerns about a controversial Senate torture review, U.S. officials said Wednesday.

  • Feinstein asks White House to edit torture report

    The head of the Senate Intelligence Committee appealed to President Barack Obama to reconsider his administration's decision to task the CIA with editing a torture report harshly critical of the spy agency's treatment of terror suspects after the Sept. 11 attacks before it can be made public.

  • Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. speaks after a closed-door meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 3, 2014, as the panel votes to approve declassifying part of a secret report on Bush-era interrogations of terrorism suspects puts the onus on the CIA and a reluctant White House to speed the release of one of the most definitive accounts about the government's actions after the 9/11 attacks. Members of the intelligence community raised concerns that the committee failed to interview top spy agency officials who had authorized or supervised the brutal interrogations.  (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

    Senate committee OKs release of CIA torture report

    The Senate Intelligence Committee has voted to release parts of a hotly contested, secret report that harshly criticizes CIA terror interrogations after 9/11, and the White House said it would instruct intelligence officials to cooperate fully.

  • Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. speaks after a closed-door meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 3, 2014, as the panel votes to approve declassifying part of a secret report on Bush-era interrogations of terrorism suspects puts the onus on the CIA and a reluctant White House to speed the release of one of the most definitive accounts about the government's actions after the 9/11 attacks. Members of the intelligence community raised concerns that the committee failed to interview top spy agency officials who had authorized or supervised the brutal interrogations.  (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

    Senate panel votes to release CIA torture report

    The Senate Intelligence Committee voted Thursday to release parts of a hotly contested, secret report that harshly criticizes CIA terror interrogations after 9/11, and the White House said it would instruct intelligence officials to cooperate fully.

  • ** FILE ** This Thursday, June 6, 2013, file photo, shows a sign outside the National Security Administration (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md. A federal judge in San Francisco stopped the destruction Monday, March 10, 2014, of millions of telephone records collected by the National Security Agency more than five years ago. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

    Senate intel panel considered phone company option, officials say

    The Senate Intelligence Committee three years ago secretly considered — but ultimately rejected — alternate ways for the National Security Agency to collect and store massive amounts of Americans' phone records, The Associated Press has learned.

  • Officials: Senate once nixed phone company option

    The Senate Intelligence Committee three years ago secretly considered - but ultimately rejected - alternate ways for the National Security Agency to collect and store massive amounts of Americans' phone records.

  • FILE - This March 11, 2014 file photo shows CIA Director John O. Brennan speaking in Washington. A Senate intelligence committee vote next week to release key sections of a voluminous, still-secret report on terror interrogations would start a declassification process that could severely test the already strained relationship between lawmakers and the CIA, and force President Barack Obama to step into the fray. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

    Terror report release may fuel Congress' CIA spat

    A Senate panel's vote this week could strain the already rancorous relationship between lawmakers and the CIA, and pressure President Barack Obama to step into the fray.

  • Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

    NAPOLITANO: Feinstein's outrage at CIA domestic spying was unleashed for the wrong reasons

    Initially, I was gratified to learn that Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, the chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, was unafraid to take on the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) over the issue of domestic spying.

  • CIA Director John O. Brennan pauses as he speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations, Tuesday, March 11, 2014, in Washington. The head of the Senate Intelligence Committee said Tuesday the CIA improperly searched a stand-alone computer network established for Congress in its investigation of allegations of CIA abuse in a Bush-era detention and interrogation program and the agency's own inspector general has referred the matter to the Justice Department for possible legal action. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Why CIA, senators still feuding over 9/11 secrets

    The festering dispute between the CIA and Senate investigators that exploded in public this week shows just how hard it can be to learn from the past and move on.

  • Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. leaves the Senate chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 11, 2014, after saying that the CIA's improper search of a stand-alone computer network established for Congress has been referred to the Justice Department. The issue stems from the investigation into allegations of CIA abuse in a Bush-era detention and interrogation program. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    Feinstein shifts tone in calling out CIA search

    Sen. Dianne Feinstein's outspoken criticism of "CIA interference" in a congressional investigation is in sharp contrast to her defense of an intelligence-gathering community that some say tramples on civil liberties.

  • Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt. leaves the Senate chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 11, 2014, after speaking in support of Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., who accused the CIA of undermining congressional oversight and the separation of powers under the Constitution.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    Senator: CIA improperly searched computer network

    The head of the Senate Intelligence Committee accused the CIA Tuesday of criminal activity in improperly searching a computer network set up for lawmakers investigating allegations that the agency used torture in terror investigations during the Bush administration.

  • Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. talks to reporters as she leaves the Senate chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 11, 2014, after saying that the CIA's improper search of a stand-alone computer network established for Congress has been referred to the Justice Department. The issue stems from the investigation into allegations of CIA abuse in a Bush-era detention and interrogation program. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    Feinstein shifts tone in calling out CIA search

    Sen. Dianne Feinstein's outspoken criticism of "CIA interference" in a congressional investigation is in sharp contrast to her defense of an intelligence-gathering community that some say trample on civil liberties.

  • Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee, leaves the chamber at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, March 5, 2014. The CIA is investigating whether its officers improperly monitored members of the Senate Intelligence Committee, which oversees the intelligence agency, U.S. officials confirmed Wednesday. Feinstein told reporters that the CIA inspector general is investigating how her committee investigated allegations of CIA abuse in a Bush-era detention and interrogation program.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    CIA investigates whether officers spied on Senate

    The CIA is investigating whether its officers improperly monitored members of the Senate Intelligence Committee, which oversees the intelligence agency, U.S. officials said Wednesday.

More Stories →

Happening Now