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This undated aerial photo provided by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows a herd of caribou on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in northeast Alaska. Petroleum drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge was not a consideration under President Barack Obama but it's getting renewed attention under the new administration. Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski and other members of the state’s congressional delegation are pushing legislation to allow drilling in the coastal plain of the refuge. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)

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undated aerial photo provided by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows a herd of caribou on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in northeast Alaska. Petroleum drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge was not a consideration under President Barack Obama but it's getting renewed attention under the new administration. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)

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FILE - In this undated file photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, a Mexican gray wolf leaves cover at the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro County, N.M. The Interior Department will ask a Denver-based court on Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017, to overturn a preliminary injunction that bars the department from releasing more Mexican gray wolves into the wild in New Mexico without that state's approval. (Jim Clark/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP, File)

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FILE - This June 2014, file photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows Debra Hill weighing a New Mexico meadow jumping mouse, which was trapped during survey efforts on the Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, N.M. Biologists who spent weeks in three New Mexico national forests searching for signs of the elusive, endangered mouse that looks somewhat like a tiny kangaroo have found what they call irrefutable evidence that it still lives in the state for which it is named. U.S. Forest Service District Ranger Beth Humphrey said Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, confirming the rodent's existence provides hope that the species can recover over time. (Stacey Stanford/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP, File)

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FILE--This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows a side view of a recently emerged adult female western glacier stonefly from below Grinnell Glacier in Glacier National Park, Mont. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Monday, Oct. 3, 2016, proposed adding the western glacier stonefly and the meltwater lednian stonefly to the government's list of threatened species.(Joe Giersch/U.S. Geological Survey via AP, File)

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In this July 6, 2016, file photo, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service personnel struggle with carrying an adult alligator gar to a transportation tank at the Private John Allen National Fish Hatchery in Tupelo, Miss. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

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This March 1, 2010 photo released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows a bistate distinct population of the greater sage grouse, rear, as he struts for a female at a lek, or mating ground, near Bridgeport, Calif. A bird found only in California and Nevada no longer faces the threat of extinction and doesn't require federal protection, officials said just months before a more-sweeping decision is due on whether to declare other sage grouse threatened or endangered in 11 Western states. (Jeannie Stafford/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)

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Sage Grouse US Fish and Wildlife.jpg

Sage-grouse. Image: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Flickr

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FILE - This July, 26, 2014 file photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows a Greater Sage Grouse at the Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge in Wyoming. A legislative rider in Congress’ $1.1 trillion spending bill would delay protections for the wide-ranging Western bird that’s been on a collision course with the oil and gas industry. The Obama administration faced a September 2015 deadline to propose protections for greater sage grouse. But the spending package agreed to late Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014 by Democrat and Republican leaders prevents the administration from spending any money next year on rules to protect the ground-dwelling bird. (AP Photo/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Tom Koerner, File)

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Image: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

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This June 2014 released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows Pacific walruses in the Chukchi Sea off the coast of Alaska. Researchers are trying to get a better handle on the size of the Pacific walrus population ahead of an expected decision by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on whether the animals need special protections. (AP Photo/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

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File-This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows a wolverine. A top federal wildlife official says there's too much uncertainty about climate change to prove it threatens the snow-loving wolverine, overruling agency scientists who warned of impending habitat loss. (AP Photo/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, File)

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A golden eagle is shown in this undated, handout photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Thursday, June 26, 2014 that a California wind farm will become the first in the U.S. to avoid prosecution if eagles are injured or die when they run into the giant turning blades. The Shiloh IV Wind Project LLC in California will receive a special permit allowing up to five golden eagles to be accidentally killed, harmed or disturbed over five years. (AP Photo/US Fish and Wildlife Service)

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This remote camera photo taken May 4, 2014 and provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, shows a black wolf that appears to be a female in the same area as the wolf OR7 in southwest Oregon’s Cascade Mountains. Oregon's famous wandering wolf, OR-7, may have found the mate he has trekked thousands of miles looking for. Wildlife authorities said Monday, May 12, 2014, that cameras on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest in the southern Cascades captured several images of what appears to be a black female wolf in the same area where OR-7's GPS collar shows he has been living. (AP Photo/USFWS)

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This remote camera photo taken May 3, 2014 and provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, shows the wolf OR7 in southwest Oregon’s Cascade Mountains. Oregon's famous wandering wolf, OR-7, may have found the mate he has trekked thousands of miles looking for. Wildlife authorities said Monday, May 12, 2014, that cameras on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest in the southern Cascades captured several images of what appears to be a black female wolf in the same area where OR-7's GPS collar shows he has been living. (AP Photo/USFWS)

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FILE -- This undated file photo from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows a portion of the Bandon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge outside Bandon, Ore., where a 400-acre salt marsh restoration has produced hordes of mosquitoes that have tormented local residents, visiting golfers and and campers. Pressed by advocacy groups, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has dropped plans to spray chemical pesticides to kill mosquitoes breeding on the refuge. Instead, the agency will use a biological pesticide that poses less risk to the crabs, crawfish and worms that fish and wildlife depend on for food. (AP Photo/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Roy W. Lowe)