U.S. Fish And Wildlife Service

Latest U.S. Fish And Wildlife Service Items
  • Quivira to remain closed when whoopers arrive

    A federal wildlife refuge in south-central Kansas will remain closed to hunting when endangered whooping cranes are migrating through, but hunters will get a new chance to go after deer and turkey in the refuge under a plan recently approved by the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service.


  • Fish and Wildlife seeks comment on plant habitats

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is seeking public comment about critical habitats for three rare plants found in Alabama, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky and Tennessee.


  • Birds coexist with development in other states

    After the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Florida Scrub-Jay as "threatened," one of the bird's unlikely heroes turned out to be a phosphate mining company.


  • Planned copper mine near Tucson faces delay

    A planned copper mine in the Santa Rita Mountains near Tucson is facing another delay after the federal government announced it would restart reviews examining the project's effects on endangered species.


  • Birds coexist with development in other states

    After the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Florida Scrub-Jay as "threatened," one of the bird's unlikely heroes turned out to be a phosphate mining company.


  • North Dakota's fish hatcheries face budget crunch

    Rob Holm says he's starting to sound a lot like Chicken Little, preaching the sky is falling.


  • Correction: Crawfish-Endangered or Not story

    In a story May 13 about whether six crawfish species need federal protection, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service had to complete studies on more than 700 species of plants and animals by 2017. The deadline applies to only 251 of those species, and the crawfish are not among them.


  • FILE - In this July 16, 2010 file photo, a scientist with the Hammond Bay Biological Station near Huron Beach, Mich., holds a female sea lamprey. The lamprey uses its disk-shaped mouth and sharp teeth to fasten onto fish and suck out their bodily fluids. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, a sea lamprey will destroy up to 40 pounds of fish during its parasitic adult stage. Fish and Wildlife will be surveying the St. Clair River from May 20 to June 26, 2014 to estimate the sea lamprey population in the river. (AP Photo/John Flesher, File)

    Crews to survey St. Clair River for sea lampreys

    Sea lampreys look alien, and Jim Frazer had a close encounter of the worst kind with one on Saturday during the Port Huron Spring Fling salmon fishing tournament.


  • Kansas congressman pursues prairie chicken protest

    Kansas Rep. Tim Huelskamp disclosed Tuesday that he's working with other members of Congress on proposals to slash the budget of the federal agency listing the lesser prairie chicken as threatened.


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