U.S. Postal Service

Latest U.S. Postal Service Items
  • Illustration: US Postal Service

    Postal Service pleads for help to stay afloat, make payroll

    The U.S. Postal Service will default on billions of dollars in workers' compensation and retiree health payments and could have trouble making payroll without help from Congress, U.S. Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe warned the Senate on Tuesday.


  • Postal Service favored Netflix, regulators rule

    Four years after inspectors found that the cash-strapped U.S. Postal Service could save tens of millions of dollars by charging Netflix for hand-sorting its DVD mailers, postal executives have refused to make the change. Now, regulators are calling the Postal Service's treatment of Netflix discriminatory.


  • LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Not a Postal Service bailout

    In The Washington Times on March 28, Ryan Cole characterized the Postal Service's $75 billion retiree benefits overpayment as "USPS taxpayer-subsidized CPR" while invoking the name of Lysander Spooner, a 19th-century postal entrepreneur. Moving forward from 19th-century postal history through the 20th century and into the early 21st century, today's Postal Service is subject to annual and pre-funding benefit payments of $11 billion a year.


  • **FILE** In this photo from May 11, 2009, a letter is mailed from a post office in Palo Alto, Calif. (Associated Press)

    New postal chief looks to control costs, raise revenue

    Patrick Donahoe takes over an agency facing multibillion-dollar deficits, declining mail volume and a looming $5.5 billion bill due by the end of the year to prefund retiree health benefits that the Postal Service can't afford to pay.


  • This handout image provided by the US Postal Service shows a postage stamp honoring jazz appreciation forever, a design which is included in the 2011 US postage stamps collection. (AP Photo/USPS)

    Space flight and Civil War saluted in new stamps

    Two of America's favorite spacemen _ the cool-headed Mercury astronaut Alan Shepard and the animated Buzz Lightyear of "Toy Story" fame _ join movie stars, musicians and artists being honored in 2011 with stamps from the U.S. Postal Service.


  • **FILE** In this photo from May 11, 2009, a letter is mailed from a post office in Palo Alto, Calif. (Associated Press)

    Oldest postal retirees get most costly of payouts

    More than 100 U.S. Postal Service employees over 90 years old are collecting workers compensation - a fact one U.S. senator calls troubling, arguing that workers ought to be moved to retirement rolls from which payouts would be less expensive.


  • **FILE** In this photo from May 11, 2009, a letter is mailed from a post office in Palo Alto, Calif. (Associated Press)

    Postal Service quietly taps new ethics officer

    The U.S. Postal Service has named a new top ethics officer in the aftermath of a series of embarrassing disclosures about a former key executive at the agency who was permitted to earn more than a quarter-million dollars in outside income and who was accused of steering contracts to former business associates.


  • Although this preliminary design shows a 44-cent value, the 2011 Reagan birth centennial postage stamp will bear a "forever" inscription when issued on Feb. 10, 2011. The stamp will always be valid for mailing a 1-ounce first-class letter, the U.S. Postal Service said. (Photo copyright 2010, U.S. Postal Service)

    Postage stamp to honor Reagan

    If it was "morning in America" for former President Ronald Reagan, a commemorative postage stamp due in February to mark the Gipper's birth centennial will forever view the sunrise.


  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
Postmaster General John E. Potter deserves $228,000 in incentive money because of his "extraordinary leadership during the difficult and unprecedented economic challenges of 2010," the Postal Service Board of Governors says.

    Retiring postmaster gets another big payday amid financial crisis

    Outgoing U.S. Postmaster General John E. Potter earned nearly $800,000 last year - an increase of more than $60,000 over the previous year - as the U.S. Postal Service faces the worst financial crisis in its history.


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