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LOUDOUN_15

LOUDOUN_15

Potomac Nine pitcher J.D. "Buckeye" Almond, of Marshall, Va., in the center, smiles at his teammates during the Loudoun Preservation Society's 19th Century Baseball Day at the Oatlands, in Leesburg, Va., Sunday, June 12, 2011. "The camaraderie is just great," he said. "We all love the game and it's blast out here." (Drew Angerer/The Washington Times)

LOUDOUN_03

LOUDOUN_03

Elkton Eclipse outfielder Glyn "Hammer" Richards, left, of Mt. Ephraim, N.J., and Potomac Nine pitcher J.D. "Buckeye" Almond, of Marshall, Va., at right, do the "bat toss" before the start of a game. The bat toss is one of unique parts of 1860s era baseball. The players start with their hands at the bottom of the bat and alternate their hands up the bat and whichever player gets to the top first and is able to cup the knob wins. The winner of the bat toss chooses if his team will field or hit first. (Drew Angerer/The Washington Times)

LOUDOUN_01

LOUDOUN_01

Potomac Nine pitcher J.D. "Buckeye" Almond, of Marshall, Va., talks to his son Wyatt, at right, before the games started at the Loudoun Preservation Society's 19th Century Baseball Day at the Oatlands, in Leesburg, Va., Sunday, June 12, 2011. (Drew Angerer/The Washington Times)

vintage_1398

vintage_1398

Potomac Nine pitcher J.D. "Buckeye" Almond, of Marshall, Va., talks to his son Wyatt, at right, before the games started at the Loudoun Preservation Society's 19th Century Baseball Day at the Oatlands, in Leesburg, Va., Sunday, June 12, 2011. Almond had many friends and family on hand to watch, as historically the day was a social affair. (Drew Angerer/The Washington Times)

vintage_1389

vintage_1389

Potomac Nine pitcher J.D. "Buckeye" Almond, of Marshall, Va., sits with his son Wyatt on his lap as they watch the games during the Loudoun Preservation Society's 19th Century Baseball Day at the Oatlands, in Leesburg, Va., Sunday, June 12, 2011. (Drew Angerer/The Washington Times)

vintage_1386

vintage_1386

Potomac Nine pitcher J.D. "Buckeye" Almond, of Marshall, Va., in the center, smiles at his teammates during the Loudoun Preservation Society's 19th Century Baseball Day at the Oatlands, in Leesburg, Va., Sunday, June 12, 2011. "The camaraderie is just great," he said. "We all love the game and it's blast out here." (Drew Angerer/The Washington Times)

vintage_1384

vintage_1384

Elkton Eclipse outfielder Glyn "Hammer" Richards, left, of Mt. Ephraim, N.J., and Potomac Nine pitcher J.D. "Buckeye" Almond, of Marshall, Va., at right, do the "bat toss" before the start of a game during the Loudoun Preservation Society's 19th Century Baseball Day at the Oatlands, in Leesburg, Va., Sunday, June 12, 2011. The bat toss is one of unique parts of 1860s era baseball. Instead of the home team always taking the field first (often in this era the teams had no "home" or "away" field), they did an activity called the bat toss. The players start with their hands at the bottom of the bat and alternate their hands up the bat and whichever player gets to the top first and is able to cup the knob wins. The winner of the bat toss chooses if his team will field or hit first. (Drew Angerer/The Washington Times)

20110616-163402-pic-584514232.jpg

20110616-163402-pic-584514232.jpg

PHOTOGRAPHS BY DREW ANGERER/THE WASHINGTON TIMES Dressed in a vintage baseball uniform, Potomac Nine pitcher J.D. "Buckeye" Almond (left), of Marshall, Va., talks to his son Wyatt before play started at the Loudoun Preservation Society's 19th Century Baseball Day at the Oatlands, in Leesburg, Va., on June 12. Three balls are a walk and fouls aren't strikes in the vintage game .