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In this July 20, 2014 photo, shooters practice with pistols at the gun range at Dragonman's, a gun dealer east of Colorado Springs, Colo. When Colorado lawmakers expanded background checks on firearms last year, they were expecting a huge increase. But the actual number the first 12 months of the law is far lower than projected, according to an analysis of state data by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

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FILE - This Dec. 23, 2012 file photo, a man shoots a revolver, at Dragonman's firing range and gun dealer, outside Colorado Springs, Colo. In an age where it’s convenient to do many things online, Colorado legislators are making one less thing possible for people to do from the comfort of their couch: Get a concealed carry permit. A new law requires people to go to a firearm instructor to show they can safely handle a firearm in person before getting a permit, seeking to close what lawmakers say is an Internet-era loophole they didn’t envision 10 years ago. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

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Marley Hendricks Totten, 4, of Washington, D.C. holds a sign that reads "Black Lives Matter" as Members of the DC chapter of the Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100) participate in a "Die-In" on the steps of the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department headquarters at 300 Indiana Avenue, NW after a Grand JuryÕs decision to not indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the killing of 18 year-old Michael Brown, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, November 25, 2014. The non-violent protest was part of a 28 hour long series of protests "aimed at bringing an end to the cycle of state sanction violence against local black communities carried out by the police." (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Members of the DC chapter of the Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100) participate in a "Die-In" on the steps of the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department headquarters at 300 Indiana Avenue, NW after a Grand Jury’s decision to not indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the killing of 18 year-old Michael Brown, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, November 25, 2014. The non-violent protest was part of a 28 hour long series of protests "aimed at bringing an end to the cycle of state sanction violence against local black communities carried out by the police." (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Members of the DC chapter of the Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100) participate in a "Die-In" on the steps of the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department headquarters at 300 Indiana Avenue, NW after a Grand Jury’s decision to not indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the killing of 18 year-old Michael Brown, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, November 25, 2014. The non-violent protest was part of a 28 hour long series of protests "aimed at bringing an end to the cycle of state sanction violence against local black communities carried out by the police." (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Amelie Zurn of Washington, D.C. holds a sign that reads "Black Lives Matter" as she joins members of the DC chapter of the Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100) to participate in a "Die-In" on the steps of the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department headquarters at 300 Indiana Avenue, NW after a Grand JuryÕs decision to not indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the killing of 18 year-old Michael Brown, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, November 25, 2014. The non-violent protest was part of a 28 hour long series of protests "aimed at bringing an end to the cycle of state sanction violence against local black communities carried out by the police." (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Members of the DC chapter of the Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100) participate in a "Die-In" on the steps of the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department headquarters at 300 Indiana Avenue, NW after a Grand Jury’s decision to not indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the killing of 18 year-old Michael Brown, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, November 25, 2014. The non-violent protest was part of a 28 hour long series of protests "aimed at bringing an end to the cycle of state sanction violence against local black communities carried out by the police." (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Protester Miya Ward goes into police headquarters to deliver a letter to Washington, D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier as members of the DC chapter of the Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100) participate in a "Die-In" on the steps of the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department headquarters at 300 Indiana Avenue, NW after a Grand JuryÕs decision to not indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the killing of 18 year-old Michael Brown, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, November 25, 2014. The non-violent protest was part of a 28 hour long series of protests "aimed at bringing an end to the cycle of state sanction violence against local black communities carried out by the police." (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Marley Hendricks Totten, 4, of Washington, D.C. holds a sign that reads "Black Lives Matter" as Members of the DC chapter of the Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100) participate in a "Die-In" on the steps of the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department headquarters at 300 Indiana Avenue, NW after a Grand JuryÕs decision to not indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the killing of 18 year-old Michael Brown, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, November 25, 2014. The non-violent protest was part of a 28 hour long series of protests "aimed at bringing an end to the cycle of state sanction violence against local black communities carried out by the police." (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Members of the DC chapter of the Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100) participate in a "Die-In" on the steps of the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department headquarters at 300 Indiana Avenue, NW after a Grand Jury’s decision to not indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the killing of 18 year-old Michael Brown, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, November 25, 2014. The non-violent protest was part of a 28 hour long series of protests "aimed at bringing an end to the cycle of state sanction violence against local black communities carried out by the police." (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Members of the DC chapter of the Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100) participate in a "Die-In" on the steps of the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department headquarters at 300 Indiana Avenue, NW after a Grand Jury’s decision to not indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the killing of 18 year-old Michael Brown, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, November 25, 2014. The non-violent protest was part of a 28 hour long series of protests "aimed at bringing an end to the cycle of state sanction violence against local black communities carried out by the police." (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Amelie Zurn of Washington, D.C. holds a sign that reads "Black Lives Matter" as she joins members of the DC chapter of the Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100) to participate in a "Die-In" on the steps of the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department headquarters at 300 Indiana Avenue, NW after a Grand JuryÕs decision to not indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the killing of 18 year-old Michael Brown, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, November 25, 2014. The non-violent protest was part of a 28 hour long series of protests "aimed at bringing an end to the cycle of state sanction violence against local black communities carried out by the police." (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Members of the DC chapter of the Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100) participate in a "Die-In" on the steps of the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department headquarters at 300 Indiana Avenue, NW after a Grand Jury’s decision to not indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the killing of 18 year-old Michael Brown, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, November 25, 2014. The non-violent protest was part of a 28 hour long series of protests "aimed at bringing an end to the cycle of state sanction violence against local black communities carried out by the police." (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Protester Miya Ward goes into police headquarters to deliver a letter to Washington, D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier as members of the DC chapter of the Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100) participate in a "Die-In" on the steps of the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department headquarters at 300 Indiana Avenue, NW after a Grand JuryÕs decision to not indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the killing of 18 year-old Michael Brown, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, November 25, 2014. The non-violent protest was part of a 28 hour long series of protests "aimed at bringing an end to the cycle of state sanction violence against local black communities carried out by the police." (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Members of the DC chapter of the Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100) participate in a "Die-In" on the steps of the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department headquarters at 300 Indiana Avenue, NW after a Grand Jury’s decision to not indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the killing of 18 year-old Michael Brown, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, November 25, 2014. The non-violent protest was part of a 28 hour long series of protests "aimed at bringing an end to the cycle of state sanction violence against local black communities carried out by the police." (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Police in riot gear use tear gas to clear the street in front of the Ferguson Police Department after the announcement of the grand jury decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson in the fatal shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed black 18-year-old, Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

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Police in riot gear use tear gas to clear the street in front of the Ferguson Police Department after the announcement of the grand jury decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson in the fatal shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed black 18-year-old, Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

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Police in riot gear move down the street past a burning police car, Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. A grand jury has decided not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

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Police in riot gear move down the street past a burning police car, Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. A grand jury has decided not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

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National Edition News cover for November 23, 2014 - Thais protest with ‘Hunger Games’ hand gesture: Nachacha Kongudom, 21, raises a three-finger salute outside a cinema where “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1” is showing, in Bangkok, Thailand, Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014. Police detained three students Thursday at the opening of the latest "Hunger Games" movie in Thailand, where opponents of May’s military coup have adopted the film’s three-finger salute as a sign of defiance. The military-imposed government has banned the gesture, which symbolizes rebellion against totalitarian rule in the film series. One cinema chain in the country's capital canceled all screenings of the movie ahead of its Thursday opening after a student group planned an anti-coup protest outside one of its theaters. Activists say police pressured the chain to halt the showings. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)