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Olivia One Feather, right, and Paul Cheoketen cheer with other audience members after the Seattle City Council voted to divest from Wells Fargo, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017, in Seattle. The City Council voted to divest $3 billion in city funds from Wells Fargo over its funding of the Dakota Access Pipeline. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

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Native American tribal members sing a welcoming song before a Seattle City Council meeting Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017, in Seattle. The Seattle City Council has voted Tuesday to cut ties with banking giant Wells Fargo over its role as a lender to the Dakota Access pipeline project as well as other business practices. Wells Fargo manages more than $3 billion of Seattle's operating account. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

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Olivia One Feather, center, of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, holds her fist up and cries tears of happiness after the Seattle City Council voted to divest from Wells Fargo over its role as a lender to the Dakota Access pipeline project and other business practices, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017, in Seattle. Wells Fargo manages more than $3 billion of Seattle's operating account. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

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Olivia One Feather, right, of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, Jessica Dominy, center, of the Muckleshoot tribe, and Paul Cheoketen, of the Wagner Saanich First Nations, smile after the Seattle City Council voted to divest from Wells Fargo, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017, in Seattle. The City Council voted to divest $3 billion in city funds from Wells Fargo over its funding of the Dakota Access Pipeline. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

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Jessica Dominy, a Muckleshoot tribal member, smiles after the Seattle City Council voted to divest from Wells Fargo, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017, in Seattle. The City Council voted to divest $3 billion in city funds from Wells Fargo over its funding of the Dakota Access Pipeline. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

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Native American drummers open a Seattle City Council meeting before a scheduled vote on whether to divest $3 billion in city funds from Wells Fargo over its funding of the Dakota Access Pipeline, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017, in Seattle. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

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Cynthia Lynet holds a sign in favor of divestiture during a Seattle City Council meeting before a scheduled vote on whether to divest $3 billion in city funds from Wells Fargo over its funding of the Dakota Access Pipeline, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017, in Seattle. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

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An attendee at a meeting of the City of Seattle's Finance Committee holds a sign that reads "Divest from Wells Fargo," Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017, at City Hall in Seattle. The committee was debating whether Seattle should stop using Wells Fargo Bank, due in part to the bank's role as a lender to the builders of the Dakota Access Pipeline. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

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Mitzie Perez, a plaintiff in a lawsuit against Wells Fargo, poses for a photo in Los Angeles, Monday, Jan. 30, 2017. Perez applied for a student loan from Wells Fargo online to help cover the costs of her education at the University of California, Riverside. She had a Social Security number, license and passport, but was not able to proceed with the loan application after she disclosed she was not a U.S. citizen or permanent resident. The suit comes amid concern among immigrant groups that President Donald Trump will cancel Obama's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program as part of a broader effort to control immigration. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

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Mitzie Perez, a plaintiff in a lawsuit against Wells Fargo, poses for a photo in Los Angeles, Monday, Jan. 30, 2017. Perez applied for a student loan from Wells Fargo online to help cover the costs of her education at the University of California, Riverside. She had a Social Security number, license and passport, but was not able to proceed with the loan application after she disclosed she was not a U.S. citizen or permanent resident. The suit comes amid concern among immigrant groups that President Donald Trump will cancel Obama's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program as part of a broader effort to control immigration. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

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FILE - This May 6, 2012, file photo, shows a Wells Fargo sign at a branch in New York. Wells Fargo announced Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017, it is completely restructuring how it pays tellers and other bank branch employees after a scandal over its aggressive sales practices. (AP Photo/CX Matiash, File)

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FILE- In this Sept. 20, 2016, file photo, Senate Banking Committee member Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., questions Wells Fargo Chief Executive Officer John Stumpf on Capitol Hill in Washington. Warren is leading a new effort to make sure vendors working with marijuana businesses don't have their banking services taken away. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

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Protesters demonstrate in Salt Lake City in support of the Standing Rock Sioux against the Dakota Access Pipeline, Monday, Oct. 31, 2016. Following a rally at the Gallivan Center, the diverse group of over 100 marched half a block to the Wells Fargo Center building, where they held a protest in the lobby. Wells Fargo is one of several major banks financing the pipeline. (Al Hartmann/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP)

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FILE - In this May 6, 2012, file photo, a Wells Fargo sign is displayed at a branch in New York. Wells Fargo has launched a new advertising campaign to address the company’s ongoing sales practices scandal and what it is doing to make things right for its customers. The campaign, which launched Monday, Oct. 24, 2016, is being rolled out nationally on the major network evening newscasts as well as the Sunday talk shows. Wells is also buying ads on the major Spanish language networks Telemundo and Univision, a bank spokesman said. (AP Photo/CX Matiash, File)

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FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, file photo, customers walk into a Wells Fargo bank in Pembroke Pines, Fla. On Friday, Oct. 14, 2016, Wells Fargo reports financial results. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)

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In this Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, photo, customers walk into a Wells Fargo bank in Pembroke Pines, Fla. Experts say Wells Fargo customers concerned about whether their accounts have been tinkered with shouldn’t wait for word from the bank. They say customers need to review all accounts, scour their credit reports, think carefully before closing a credit card account and perhaps even consider leaving the bank. That comes after Wells Fargo has been fined $185 million by regulators who said bank employees opened more than 2 million unauthorized deposit and credit card accounts to meet sales goals. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

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In this Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016, photo, Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, before the Senate Banking Committee. The San Francisco Fed said Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, that Stumpf is resigning his position on the Federal Reserve's advisory council amid a scandal over millions of accounts allegedly opened by the bank without customers' permission. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

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In this Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016, photo, Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, before the Senate Banking Committee. The San Francisco Fed said Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, that Stumpf is resigning his position on the Federal Reserve's advisory council amid a scandal over millions of accounts allegedly opened by the bank without customers' permission. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

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Wells Fargo Chief Executive Officer John Stumpf testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016, before Senate Banking Committee. Stumpf was called before the committee for betraying customers' trust in a scandal over allegations that employees opened millions of unauthorized accounts to meet aggressive sales targets. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

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This Dec. 4, 2013, file photo shows Pitbull performing in concert during the Q102 Jingle Ball at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia. (Photo by Owen Sweeney/Invision/AP, File)