Topic - World Food Programme

Subscribe to this topic via RSS or ATOM
Related Stories
  • Dire situation: For Syrian refugees in Lebanon, the urgent need for food, water and shelter takes priority over concerns about sanitation, medical care and education. Photo by Omar Alkalouti

    Syrian refugee influx outpaces aid in Lebanon

    Lebanon has more refugees in need of humanitarian aid than international agencies can accommodate, and the situation worsens daily as Syrians enter the country to escape civil war.

  • South Sudan's President Salva Kiir, left, and rebel leader Riek Machar, right, shake hands and pray before signing an agreement of the cease-fire of the conflict in South Sudan in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia,  Friday, May 9, 2014. The South Sudan's president has reached a cease-fire agreement with the rebel leader, an African regional bloc said Friday, after a vicious cycle of revenge killings drew international alarm. (AP Photo/Elias Asmare)

    South Sudan peace deal hailed, but will it hold?

    South Sudan's top U.N. aid official on Saturday hailed a new peace deal and called for food aid to flow to counter the risk of mass hunger. A military spokesman said a cease-fire would take hold, but wary skepticism remained: This is the conflict's second peace deal.

  • In this Nov. 6, 2013 photo, a World Food Program vehicle drives on a mountain road near the city of Kimchaek, in northeastern North Korea. A funding crunch for aid to North Korea has become so severe 500,000 rural schoolchildren are as of April 2014,  no longer receiving assistance and aid to millions more could soon dry up, according to a report obtained by The Associated Press. The report underscores the flight of international donors to countries with less political baggage and more willingness to let aid workers do their jobs. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

    AP Exclusive: Foreign food aid drying up in NKorea

    A funding crunch for aid to North Korea has become so severe 500,000 rural schoolchildren are as of this month no longer receiving assistance and aid to millions more could soon dry up, according to a report obtained by The Associated Press. The report underscores the flight of international donors to countries with less political baggage and more willingness to let aid workers do their jobs.

  • In this image taken from video obtained from the Ugarit News, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting on Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012, Syrians react after a government warplane was shot down in Aleppo, Syria, on Monday, Oct. 15, 2012. (AP Photo/Ugarit News via AP video)

    Syrian planes pound rebels in north

    Syrian government warplanes unleashed deadly airstrikes on rebel strongholds in the country's north on Tuesday, activists reported.

  • 50 Cent visits famine victims in Somalia, Kenya

    Rapper 50 Cent is teaming up with the World Food Program to see firsthand the effects of hunger in Somalia and Kenya.

  • Somalis from southern Somalia wait with their malnourished children in Banadir Hospital in the capital of Mogadishu, Somalia, on Monday, Aug. 15, 2011. (AP Photo)

    Somalia famine aid stolen; U.N. investigating

    Thousands of sacks of food aid meant for Somalia's famine victims have been stolen and are being sold at markets in the same neighborhoods where skeletal children in filthy refugee camps can't find enough to eat, an Associated Press investigation has found.

  • A child from southern Somalia, is treated for malnourishment in Banadir hospital in Mogadishu, Somalia, Friday, Aug. 5, 2011. The United Nations predicts famine will probably spread to all of southern Somalia within a month and force tens of thousands more people to flee into the capital of Mogadishu. (AP Photo/Farah Abdi Warsameh)

    Gunfire said to kill 7 as aid is looted in Somalia

    Somali government troops opened fire during a looting rampage at a World Food Program food distribution program in Mogadishu on Friday, killing at least seven famine refugees, witnesses said.

  • Somalia offensive: 300 new militants in Mogadishu

    Heavy fighting erupted Thursday in Somalia's capital as African Union peacekeepers launched an offensive aimed at protecting famine relief efforts from attacks by al Qaeda-linked militants, officials said. At least six people died.

  • Food supplements airlifted into famine-hit Somalia

    A plane carrying 10 tons of urgently needed nutritional supplements to treat malnourished children has landed in famine-hit Somalia, a U.N. official said Wednesday.

  • Briefly: Africa

    A plane carrying 10 tons of urgently needed nutritional supplements to treat malnourished children has landed in famine-hit Somalia, a U.N. official said Wednesday.

  • Illustration: North Korea by John Camejo for The Washington Times

    ROBERTSON: Silent spring in North Korea

    The pro-democracy protests in the Middle East and North Africa have provoked China and Vietnam to crack down harshly on their dissidents lest they think they can emulate the "Jasmine Revolutions." But from North Korea, arguably the most repressive dictatorship in Asia, there continues to be nothing but radio silence. The silence doesn't mean everything is fine there, though. In fact, people are starving, and the situation is dire. It is hard to find the energy to protest when you are focused on survival.

  • Officials: U.N. air crew kidnapped in Darfur

    Three Bulgarians flying aircraft for the World Food Program in Sudan were kidnapped Thursday in its troubled western Darfur region, officials said.

  • Victims of a suicide bombing are treated at a hospital in Khar, the main town of Pakistan's Bajur tribal region along Afghan border, on Saturday, Dec. 25, 2010. A female suicide bomber detonated an explosives-laden vest, killing scores of people at an aid distribution center, officials said. (AP Photo/Anwarullah Khan)

    Thousands fear hunger after Pakistan bombing

    Some 300,000 desperately poor villagers impoverished by fighting in Pakistan's tribal belt are scrambling to feed themselves after a female suicide bomber killed 45 people outside a World Food Program food distribution center, triggering a district-wide suspension of the relief project.

  • A Pakistani flood survivor interacts with Rajiv Shah, left, administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development, during his visit to camp in Sukkur, Pakistan on Wednesday, Aug. 25, 2010. (AP Photo/Khurram Shahzad)

    USAID head hurried out of Pakistan relief camp

    USAID Administrator Raj Shah was forced to cut short a visit to a flood relief camp in Pakistan this week after his security detail detected “suspicious individuals” in the area.

  • Saudi aid bails out U.N. food agency

    The U.N.'s lead food aid agency said yesterday it has raised the money to cover an emergency funding shortfall due to soaring world food and fuel prices, thanks in large part to a last-minute $500 million donation from Saudi Arabia.

More Stories →

Happening Now