Topic - Yvette M. Alexander

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Quotations
  • Ms. Alexander, who was elected as a Democrat from Ward 7 in 2007, said she didn't think changing parties would be dishonest and that she is considering the run to raise her political profile while making room for other candidates.

    Minority parties see power grab for D.C. vote →

  • "I would want, if possible, the entire council to be a member of my party, if the people so desire. To have set-aside limits, that's going to be a case where people don't really have a choice," said Ms. Alexander, adding that she would support elimination of the set-aside seats.

    Minority parties see power grab for D.C. vote →

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