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Dig it: Archaeologists scour Woodstock ‘69 concert field

- Associated Press

Archaeologists scouring the grassy hillside famously trampled during the 1969 Woodstock music festival carefully sifted through the dirt from a time of peace, love, protest and good vibes.

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In this May 11, 2016 photo, Sierra Nevada red fox wanders near Mt. Bachelor, west of Bend, Ore. (Andy Tullis/The Bulletin via AP)

On the hunt in Oregon for a rare Sierra Nevada red fox

- Associated Press

In a dense forest at the base of Mount Bachelor, two wildlife biologists slowly walked toward a small cage trap they hoped would contain a rare red fox species. Jamie Bowles, an Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife technician in Bend, and Tim Hiller, founder of the Montana-based Wildlife Ecology Institute, stepped carefully as branches crunched under their feet.

FILE - In this May 27, 2018, file photo, U.S. Marine Corps Sergeant Major Darrell Carver, based in North Carolina, touches a headstone at the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery in Belleau, France. France and Belgium are urging UNESCO to designate scores of their World War I memorials and cemeteries as World Heritage sites as the centennial remembrance of the 1914-1918 war nears its end. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo, File)

France, Belgium seek UNESCO recognition for WWI memorials

- Associated Press

France and Belgium are urging UNESCO to designate scores of their World War I memorials and cemeteries as World Heritage sites as the centennial remembrance of the 1914-1918 war nears its end.

Traffic spirals up and down a section of Route 495 to the Lincoln Tunnel, Thursday, June 21, 2018, in Weehauken, N.J. An estimated two-and-a-half-year rehabilitation project on a separate section of 495 will create "severe congestion" according to the state's Department of Transportation. The New York City skyline is in the background. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Major New York-area traffic bottleneck about to get worse

- Associated Press

It is the bane of tourists and truckers, theatergoers and weekday 9-to-5ers: the congested, pothole-strewn roadway that bisects the teeming towns overlooking the Hudson River before descending into the Lincoln Tunnel to New York City.

In this June 1, 2018 photo, Clayton "Cole" Cole carries a portrait of his brother, Lee Cole, as he hikes into the Strawberry Hill area of Colorado Springs, Colo., to the spot where his brother posted a Facebook Live video before taking his own life by jumping off a cliff. Lee Cole, 39, was an Army National Guard veteran who was struggling with depression, PTSD, and chronic pain he'd suffered after a training accident before being deployed. His body was found April 2, by a stranger who'd seen the Facebook post and headed out to find him. (Christian Murdock/The Gazette via AP)

Colorado vet's death offers glimpse into suicidal mind

- Associated Press

Hours after being discharged from a mental health treatment facility, 38-year-old disabled veteran Lee Cole hiked into a wilderness area in southwest Colorado Springs with a backpack and the cellphone on which he planned to record his final message.

FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2017 file photo, Yellowstone Superintendent Dan Wenk speaks at an event marking a conservation agreement for a former mining site just north of the park in Jardine, Mont. Democrats are asking U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to explain the reassignment of dozens of senior agency officials including Wenk. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)

Democrats want US Interior Department staff moves explained

- Associated Press

Democrats in Congress pressed U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke on Friday to explain the reassignments of dozens of senior agency officials, most recently Yellowstone National Park's superintendent, who was offered an unwanted transfer and then told he'd be gone in August.

Utah judge: Group owes county legal fees for Bears Ears case

Associated Press

A Utah judge is ordering an advocacy group to reimburse San Juan County for the costs of a lawsuit that accused local officials of improperly meeting with Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke before he cut the size of Bears Ears National Monument.