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Sgt. Roberto Martinez, a martial arts instructor at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., initiates a pugil stick match during training July 8, 2013. Each recruit participated in two matches. Recruits train with pugil sticks, which represent rifles with attached bayonets, to simulate close-range encounter with an enemy. Bayonet training, along with other hand-to-hand fighting skills, is encompassed in the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which contributes to the mental, character and physical development of Marines. Approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of men and 100 percent of women in the Marine Corps. Martinez is from West Covina, Calif.  (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. David Bessey)
Photo by: Lance Cpl. David Bessey
Sgt. Roberto Martinez, a martial arts instructor at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., initiates a pugil stick match during training July 8, 2013. Each recruit participated in two matches. Recruits train with pugil sticks, which represent rifles with attached bayonets, to simulate close-range encounter with an enemy. Bayonet training, along with other hand-to-hand fighting skills, is encompassed in the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which contributes to the mental, character and physical development of Marines. Approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of men and 100 percent of women in the Marine Corps. Martinez is from West Covina, Calif. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. David Bessey)

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