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In this May 9, 2016 photo, Rick Weiland talks about how open and non-partisan primaries work in Nebraska and how he believes they would be best for South Dakota as well, in Sioux Falls, S.D. Foes of a wide-ranging ballot measure billed as a government anti-corruption package are taking aim at a taxpayer-financed system for political contributions in their campaign to sink the initiative in November. Supporter Weiland says it would make politicians less reliant on big donors and give “everyday folks” a voice in the process other than their vote. (Elisha Page /The Argus Leader via AP)

In this May 9, 2016 photo, Rick Weiland talks about how open and non-partisan primaries work in Nebraska and how he believes they would be best for South Dakota as well, in Sioux Falls, S.D. Foes of a wide-ranging ballot measure billed as a government anti-corruption package are taking aim at a taxpayer-financed system for political contributions in their campaign to sink the initiative in November. Supporter Weiland says it would make politicians less reliant on big donors and give “everyday folks” a voice in the process other than their vote. (Elisha Page /The Argus Leader via AP)

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