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FILE - In this Oct. 16, 2012, file photo, Travis Tygart, the CEO of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, speaks during an interview at his office in Colorado Springs, Colo. An Associated Press analysis of the testing protocol, approved by the league and the NFL Players Association after more than three years of wrangling, found that only the most reckless or uninformed player would seem to have a chance of getting caught using HGH, which has become popular in a variety of sports for its supposed ability to enhance performance in various ways. Tygart and other leaders of the anti-doping movement agree that, while checking athletes for that specific performance-enhancer is better than not checking at all, testing alone merely skims the surface of what must be done to find cheaters _ especially given the limitations of a test that only is able to detect synthetic HGH in a person's system for 48 hours. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski, File)

FILE - In this Oct. 16, 2012, file photo, Travis Tygart, the CEO of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, speaks during an interview at his office in Colorado Springs, Colo. An Associated Press analysis of the testing protocol, approved by the league and the NFL Players Association after more than three years of wrangling, found that only the most reckless or uninformed player would seem to have a chance of getting caught using HGH, which has become popular in a variety of sports for its supposed ability to enhance performance in various ways. Tygart and other leaders of the anti-doping movement agree that, while checking athletes for that specific performance-enhancer is better than not checking at all, testing alone merely skims the surface of what must be done to find cheaters _ especially given the limitations of a test that only is able to detect synthetic HGH in a person's system for 48 hours. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski, File)

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