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Polly Olson, an EMS instructor from Chappell, Neb., looks at simulated injuries on a mannequin, in a mobile training unit parked outside the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb., Tuesday, July 26, 2016. A $5.5 million grant from the Leona and Harry Helmsley foundation will pay for four specialized training trucks to be stationed across the state for three years. The trucks have high-tech simulators in the back that can be used to help train people on advanced techniques, such as opening a patient's airway after a car accident. About 80 percent of Nebraska's emergency responders are volunteers, and it can be hard for them to get certified in such advanced techniques. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

Polly Olson, an EMS instructor from Chappell, Neb., looks at simulated injuries on a mannequin, in a mobile training unit parked outside the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb., Tuesday, July 26, 2016. A $5.5 million grant from the Leona and Harry Helmsley foundation will pay for four specialized training trucks to be stationed across the state for three years. The trucks have high-tech simulators in the back that can be used to help train people on advanced techniques, such as opening a patient's airway after a car accident. About 80 percent of Nebraska's emergency responders are volunteers, and it can be hard for them to get certified in such advanced techniques. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

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