FAKE_19690720_8937 - Washington Times
Skip to content

Astronaut Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin Jr.  poses for a photograph beside the U.S. flag deployed on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission on July 20, 1969.  (AP Photo/NASA/Neil A. Armstrong)
Conspiracy theorists have claimed that photos of the lunar landings are bogus due to: a lack of visible stars; inconsistent shadows and lighting that seem to track with a studio production; what looks like the letter “C†written on a moon rock and the lunar surface; an Australian woman’s alleged claim that she saw a soft drink bottle in the frame while watching one of the manned landings take place on live television. NASA has provided plausible explanations for all of the above: Stars weren’t visible due to the brightness of the sun during the lunar daytime; inconsistent shadows and lighting were the result of lens distortion, lunar dust, uneven ground and multiple light sources; the “C†shape does not appear in original lunar camera film and is believed to be a coiled hair that made its way into the printing processes
Photo by: NEIL A. ARMSTRONG
Astronaut Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin Jr. poses for a photograph beside the U.S. flag deployed on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission on July 20, 1969. (AP Photo/NASA/Neil A. Armstrong) Conspiracy theorists have claimed that photos of the lunar landings are bogus due to: a lack of visible stars; inconsistent shadows and lighting that seem to track with a studio production; what looks like the letter “C†written on a moon rock and the lunar surface; an Australian woman’s alleged claim that she saw a soft drink bottle in the frame while watching one of the manned landings take place on live television. NASA has provided plausible explanations for all of the above: Stars weren’t visible due to the brightness of the sun during the lunar daytime; inconsistent shadows and lighting were the result of lens distortion, lunar dust, uneven ground and multiple light sources; the “C†shape does not appear in original lunar camera film and is believed to be a coiled hair that made its way into the printing processes

Featured Photo Galleries

CounselGalleryCOVER.jpg

Special Counsels Rack Up Bills

Robert Mueller’s special counsel investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election has cost $6.7 million during the first four and a half months of the probe. Click to see past independent counsel investigations guilty of racking up high bills.