- The Washington Times - Tuesday, April 10, 2001

Books

• "A Time to Heal: The Road to Recovery for Adult Children of Alcoholics," by Dr. Timmen L. Cermak, Jeremy P. Tarcher Inc., 1988. This book is a must-read for every adult child of an alcoholic. Written by a noted authority in the field and an adult child of an alcoholic father, the book offers hope and provides insight into the various issues faced by adult children.

• "Adult Children of Alcoholics," by Janet Geringer Woititz, Ed.D., Health Communications Inc., 1983. An easy read, this book brought national attention to the issues faced by adult children of alcoholics.

• "Beyond Codependency and Getting Better All the Time," by Melody Beattie, the Hazelden Foundation, 1989. Written by an adult child of an alcoholic, the book deals with issues involving the dynamics of healthy recovery.

• "Changing Course," by Claudia Black, Ph.D., Mac Publishing, 1993, updated 1999. This book is designed to help adult children of alcoholics acknowledge how the past has affected them and offers help in choosing a new course.

• "From Survival to Recovery: Growing Up in an Alcoholic Home," Al-Anon Family Groups, 1994. This book is written by Al-Anon members and provides stories of recovery and hope.

• "The Alcoholic Family in Recovery," by Stephanie Brown, Ph.D., and Virginia B. Lewis, Ph.D., Guilford, 1999. This book outlines the four stages of recovery and the difficulties encountered during this process.

• "The Family Recovery Guide: A Map for Healthy Growth," by Stephanie Brown, Ph.D., and Virginia B. Lewis, Ph.D., and Andrew Lot, New Harbinger, 2000.

• "Recovery: A Guide for Adult Children of Alcoholics," by Herbert B. Gravity and Julie D. Bowmen, Simon & Schuster, 1985. This book explores questions adult children may have and provides inspiration to begin the journey.

• "Children of Alcoholism: The Struggle for Self and Intimacy in Adult Life," by Barbara L. Wood, New York University Press, 1987.

Associations

• Adult Children of Alcoholics World Service Organization Inc., PO Box 3216, Torrance, Calif. 90510. Phone: 310/534-1815. Web site (www.adultchildren.com). This nonprofit organization was established by adult children in 1985 to share experiences and provide a means of education and support. Its Web site has a worldwide listing of meetings and events as well as a variety of literature.

• The National Association for Children of Alcoholics, 11426 Rockville Pike, Suite 100, Rockville, Md. 29852. Phone: 301/468-0985. Web site (www.nacoa.net). This nonprofit organization was founded in 1983 by a core group of 15 mental health professionals and clinicians. Its original mission was to deal with issues facing adult children of alcoholics. That focus has shifted toward educating and working to raise awareness about the 11 million children younger than 18 living in homes with an alcoholic parent. The association's Web site is a good resource for understanding how alcoholism affects everyone in the family.

On line

• The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Web site (www.niaaa.nih.gov) provides a wealth of information relating to the disease of alcoholism.

• The Awareness Centers Web site (www.drjan.com) is dedicated to the late Janet Being Waiting, who did research on children of alcoholics. The site provides links to a variety of resources.

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